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Chip-skiff
10-17-2009, 01:12 AM
The Wolf Goddess borrowed my .270 (which has a better scope than hers) and tramped out the last day of deer season. Working on the greenhouse frame, I heard a shot from the slopes across the river and climbed up to help her get it in: a fine young buck.

A friend who teaches meat processing at the uni came out to help her cut it up, and was waxing eloquent about a roast outboard of the pelvic bone (more bone than meat) that frequently gets minced up. So quick like a shot, I got it whole in a roasting pan and into the oven with cloves of garlic and quartered yellow onions, and lashings of olive oil and thyme over all.

Side dishes: boiled potatoes and whole baby portabella mushrooms, browned separately and heated together with the onions and garlic from the roaster, and steamed green beans.

While resting the meat, I dashed red wine in the roaster along with some wild currant jelly that failed to gel (she picked the currants nearby) salt, pepper and parsley, and stirred up a reduction sauce.

A bottle of old vine Mourvedre completed the meal.

All praise to her hunting skill, (and the deer spirits and wine gods).

switters
10-17-2009, 09:04 AM
all praise, and I'm hungry now.

Phillip Allen
10-17-2009, 09:33 AM
The Wolf Goddess borrowed my .270 (which has a better scope than hers) and tramped out the last day of deer season. Working on the greenhouse frame, I heard a shot from the slopes across the river and climbed up to help her get it in: a fine young buck.

A friend who teaches meat processing at the uni came out to help her cut it up, and was waxing eloquent about a roast outboard of the pelvic bone (more bone than meat) that frequently gets minced up. So quick like a shot, I got it whole in a roasting pan and into the oven with cloves of garlic and quartered yellow onions, and lashings of olive oil and thyme over all.

Side dishes: boiled potatoes and whole baby portabella mushrooms, browned separately and heated together with the onions and garlic from the roaster, and steamed green beans.

While resting the meat, I dashed red wine in the roaster along with some wild currant jelly that failed to gel (she picked the currants nearby) salt, pepper and parsley, and stirred up a reduction sauce.

A bottle of old vine Mourvedre completed the meal.

All praise to her hunting skill, (and the deer spirits and wine gods).

My son now has a job in Wyhoming...(did we discuss this already?)
I like to call it Cattle Prod, Wyoming though the real name excapes me...
I know he'd like to hunt but hasn't a clue about that country...whitetails in arkansas is all...his only rifle (which I have here and did some stock repairs on) is worthless for that country...it's a lever action .45 Colt...I doubt he can stalk close enough to ever use it

Chip-skiff
10-17-2009, 06:52 PM
Switters- you should pop up sometime with your new partner and I'll give you a mixed grill. Running out of sailing time, and the wee skiff is still in pieces. Too many projects at once.

Phillip- we did the Cattle Prod, Wyoming waltz once already. I was a bit hard on NW Arkansas. I suspect that battery-powered cattle prods were invented rather late in the game to have an eponymous town. Open-range cowhands herded with whips and curses. So why is there no %^$@#*&^$!!!!, Wyoming?

In any event, here is an authentic nautical reference for my home state, so bloody far from an ocean that it's tragic:

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.wyomingtalesandtrails.com/wyoschooner.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.wyomingtalesandtrails.com/usswyoming2.html&usg=__1bNWcTH-LmSZDv8WviffNrwU6WI=&h=348&w=550&sz=25&hl=en&start=1&tbnid=HlSAyGn5jUV7IM:&tbnh=84&tbnw=133&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dschooner%2BWyoming%26gbv%3D2%26hl%3De n%26safe%3Doff%26sa%3DG


The most famous of the civilian ships named Wyoming was the six-masted schooner Wyoming constructed at the Percy & Small boatyard, Bath, Maine, in 1909. The ship was the longest wooden ship ever constructed, 329 feet long.

http://www.wyomingtalesandtrails.com/wyo5mast.jpg
The Six-Masted Wyoming under construction, Bath, Maine, 1909. At the ship's christening, she was sponsored by Lena Natrona Brooks (McCleary), the daughter of Wyoming Governor Bryant Butler Brooks. The schooner represented the highest development in the construction of wooden sailing vessels. She cost $175,000 (in 1909 dollars) to construct and measured 3,730 tons. "Tons" when used with regard to a vessel refers to the volume of the ship not its weight. One ton equals 100 cubic feet of volume using a formula originally created in 1773. The total internal volume of a ship is its gross tonnage. Subtraction of that portion of the ship not used for cargo will produce the net tonnage. The total weight of the vessel laden is the displacement measured in long tons of 2240 lbs. The weight of the vessel is determined by subtracting from the displacement the difference in displacement when the ship is fully unloaded. The Wyoming had 3730 gross tons, 3036 net tons, and 6004 tons deadweight. The purpose of the measurement of tonnage was to determine port dues.

http://www.wyomingtalesandtrails.com/wyoschooner.jpg
The Schooner Wyoming With the ship's great length, a problem developed. In heavy seas, the ship's frame tended to twist or buckle, loosening the planking. Thus, the ship generally required the use of pumps. In March, 1924, the Wyoming was bound from Norfolk, Virginia for St. John, New Brunswick under the command of Captain Charles Gaesel of Boston and a crew of 13. On March 10, a nor'easter hit the coast of New England. The Wyoming was seen at dusk that day by the Cora F. Cressey off the Pollock Rip Lightship. The Wyoming was apparently anchored in an effort to ride out the storm. The area was the same in which the fishing schooner Washakie had been lost eleven years before. The Wyoming was never seen again. The lightship, itself, in 36 hours of gale force winds was thrown on its beam ends and shipped heavy seas notwithstanding that it was running its engine. The lightship was lost with all hands on September 14, 1944.

http://www.wyomingtalesandtrails.com/7mastwyo.jpg
The Schooner Wyoming

switters
10-19-2009, 11:24 AM
Thanks Chip, getting ready for elk season in two weeks. I will send word when I get back and plan an outing to Wyoming. I know what you mean by too many projects. The larger the shop space the more projects I have going at once. There were some advantages to working in a single car garage.

katey
10-19-2009, 11:50 AM
Chip,

My question is how on earth did the currant jelly not gel? Mine is chewy like an eraser unless I cut it with raspberries!

Chip-skiff
10-21-2009, 01:09 AM
Chip,My question is how on earth did the currant jelly not gel? Mine is chewy like an eraser unless I cut it with raspberries!

Some of her batches gelled to a near-epoxy firmness. Others came out liquid. If I knew the difference, I'd tell the world.