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Paul Pless
10-16-2009, 06:11 AM
A cold front was coming, and the 30-year-old Rapid City angler thought the change might "prompt a good bite."

He never expected just how good it would be. Anderson hooked a 50-pound, 8-ounce Great Lakes muskie that quickly was confirmed as the state record.

"I had a feeling it was going to be a good day," Anderson said. "A cold snap was predicted. I thought it might up the odds of catching an elusive Torch Lake muskie.

State officials say Anderson's record replaces the 48-pound record set in 1984 by the late Charles Edgecomb, of Rapids City. He caught his muskie in Skegemog Lake in Kalkaska County.

Officials also confirmed Anderson's 55-inch-long muskie fish was a 15-year-old female named Queen. It was one of 19 muskies tagged with an accoustic device by biologists during the past two years. The device allows researchers to study the fish's movement through the 75-mile, 14-lake Chain O'Lakes region, which includes Torch and Skegemog lakes.

Muskies are considered the top predator fish in the Great Lakes and are a huge draw for anglers. The state adopted a plan this summer to expand the number of waters where the big, toothy fish might be found in the future.

"This is a gem of a fishery," said Nick Popoff, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources fish biologist who certified Anderson's muskie. "It's a pretty big deal. I think it is neat that he caught it here.

"Lake St. Clair has been the destination muskie spot, but we think this (area) is, too. St. Clair doesn't grow fish this big. They get as long but don't put on as much weight."

Popoff, who also is Anderson's friend, said Queen's death was to be expected, because it is among the risks that comes with studying a public fishery.

Queen hit Anderson's Muskie Magnet lure at 7:50 a.m. that Sunday. The rod shook, and Anderson slowed the boat to see what he had.

"I was extremely excited," Anderson said. "When I saw that white belly, I knew it was bigger than anything I had caught. This was the first time my drag has ever gone off on Torch Lake."

Torch Lake muskies, at least big ones, are more myth than fact, according to Anderson, who spends most days fishing along the Chain of Lakes.

"Most people never encounter them in Torch Lake," he said. "You hear stories and rumors, which get you going."

Anderson said he intended to release the fish, nut Queen appeared to be in trouble, and an hour of trying to help accomplished nothing.

The fish continued to lay in the water along side the boat, barely moving. Anderson finally had to leave for work.

"If anyone deserves it (the record), he does," Popoff said. "He puts an excessive amount of time into the sport. He fishes every day of the year, knows a lot about the fishery. He fishes trout and walleye, but his main passion is muskie.

Anderson said he has "mixed emotions" about his record fish.

"I am happy to have caught a big fish, but very disappointed that it didn't swim away," he said. "If it had, it would still be out in the lake and this would just be a fish story."


http://media.mlive.com/outdoors_impact/photo/kyle-anderson-record-muskie-9f6ddf83b1f2eb4d_medium.jpg

Iceboy
10-16-2009, 07:13 AM
Big fish! I haven't seen one near that size since I was a kid. My great uncle Posey used to row troll for them with cane poles. He kept a 22 pistol with him to calm them down before boating them. Mighty tasty too if done right.

Dan McCosh
10-16-2009, 02:25 PM
Another crack in the great tradition of Muskie fishing. Since no one ever catches a Muskie, it is assumed that going fishing for one is a cover for poker and beer in a rural campground. Sort of like a wet version of deer hunting.

Paul Pless
10-16-2009, 02:33 PM
They're sorta edible. In most all the lakes where these live, there are fish that are easier to catch and easier to clean that taste just as good or better. Think walleye, pickeral, etc... etc...

Paul Pless
10-16-2009, 02:40 PM
You never fish for or catch stripers Norman?

Keith Wilson
10-16-2009, 02:52 PM
Walleyes taste better and are a lot easier to catch. Muskie fishermen are a strange obsessed breed; sort of freshwater versions of captain Ahab.

Paul Pless
10-16-2009, 03:01 PM
I never learned how.... but I won a 'personal lesson' in a charity auction a few months ago, to be given by a guy around here who teaches fishing in the local adult education program. He's a friend of my wife's, and he's guaranteed to get me to catch a keeper.... I'm looking forward to it, because I love eating striped bass... and they grow big around here... we might go down to the Cape Cod Canal, I think, or Duxbury Beach, which I hear is a good spot. I presume he'll know where the best place is.

This could be the beginning of a new obsession for you.:D

For a long time they were, and probably still are my favorite species of fish to go after. The Alabama state record striper at 55 pounds was caught on a little travelled bit of river a few miles from my home in Alabama.

I am looking forward to learning to fish for the many great game and food species up here though.:)

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-16-2009, 04:31 PM
That looks suspiciously like a pike. Hereabouts people do the catch-n-release thing with them, though in Scotland you are encouraged to kill them, and eat if you feel up to it.

Caught a 7lb example once - on my trout rod - stunning fight, I can only guess what a 40+ pound fish might do.

Keith Wilson
10-16-2009, 05:02 PM
Northern pikes are smaller relatives of muskies, and there are naturally occurring hybrids as well. Northerns are very tasty, but have a lot of nasty little bones.

htom
10-16-2009, 05:11 PM
That's a big Muskie. They're great fun to catch (and release); I've been told that they have more fight-per-ounce than any other fresh-water fish. Walleye and Northern are better tasting, at least to my palate (but there have been many more of them, too.)

C. Ross
10-16-2009, 05:19 PM
Walleyes taste better and are a lot easier to catch. Muskie fishermen are a strange obsessed breed; sort of freshwater versions of captain Ahab.

:D:D:D

This'll probably get me pegged as as Northern White Trash, but bullhead or catfish from a clean lake is deeee-licious. Emphasis on clean lake.

Paul Pless
10-16-2009, 06:10 PM
Ain't nothing wrong with catfish Mr. Ross. I prefer squealers myself, caught from a river, about 12 -14 inches inches long, skinned, gutted, and beheaded, fried whole after rolling in cornmeal, the tail fin should be left on. Best eaten hot out of the grease, with very cold beer, on a river bank around a campfire with good friends.

Paul Pless
10-16-2009, 06:13 PM
This is the plug that that big Musky was caught on. So you reckon a bunch of these were purchased today and the boatramps will be packed at Torch Lake in the morning?

http://www.muskymagnet.com/store/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/5e06319eda06f020e43594a9c230972d/f/i/file_1_1.jpg

Robert Meyer
10-16-2009, 06:19 PM
I remember as a lad freezing on Elk Lake (part of the Skegomog - Torch Lake - Chain-o-Lakes) ice fishing with my Grandfather. Mostly we caught perch - occasionally a walleye - but the prize was always a muskie. I can only remember Gramps catching two or three muskies over many years of dedicated ice fishing. Not even close to this record monster. But each muskie was good for years of bragging.
http://lh4.ggpht.com/_AvIaww6GUxk/SnDu2mGOiIE/AAAAAAAAAHE/RVfAozDziK0/s144-c/Desktop.jpg

BrianW
10-16-2009, 06:43 PM
That's a great picture Robert.

C. Ross
10-16-2009, 09:17 PM
Ain't nothing wrong with catfish Mr. Ross. I prefer squealers myself, caught from a river, about 12 -14 inches inches long, skinned, gutted, and beheaded, fried whole after rolling in cornmeal, the tail fin should be left on. Best eaten hot out of the grease, with very cold beer, on a river bank around a campfire with good friends.

Amen brother!

If there are yellow bullhead in Hell give them a chance. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_bullhead When I was a kid our family had a place in northern Wisconsin, we'd throw out stinkbait in the late afternoon and then fish at dusk, bring back a couple of dozen, and prepare and cook them EXACTLY as you describe -- tail on as a handle. The pectoral fins have a nasty barb that you want to avoid and can't forget, but they make a great fish fry.

Leon or Captain Blight might back me up on this...

Captain Blight
10-19-2009, 12:22 PM
Captain Blight will indeed back you up on this (though a bit late; sorry. Put in 27 hours in two days at the 'Dome.). There's an oak tree on my uncle's lake property that is studded with nails at shoulder height. This is because we clean these fish by nailing their heads to the tree and ripping the skin off with a pair of pliers. It sticks so tight that it's about the only way to peel 'em, but that's where arll the nasty taste hides so off it comes.

For my money, there is no finer fish than bluegills caught out of clean water. Umaga-toro sushi comes close, pompano en papillote even closer. But the true Ambrosia is only a Red Wiggler away.

ishmael
10-19-2009, 09:40 PM
Ah, the fisherfolk.

I grew up fishing out of an open boat. Hooks and worms or minnows. Yellow Perch, Black Bass and Walleye. Muskellunge were there, but we never hooked one. I'll tell ya, Yellow Perch, scaled, gutted, fried up golden with a flour dusting, makes a fine complement to bacon and eggs for breakfast.

George, a cousin, would save part his catch in the freezer and once a summer would have a community fish fry. Wood fires and frying pans. Come one come all and bring fish if you got 'em! George was a sweet fellow, always willing to lend a hand, always willing to laugh or be laughed at.

Sweet memories of a sweet time.