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Paul Pless
10-12-2009, 09:31 AM
Other than the Nobel Prize for Chemistry and the Nobel Prize for Literature, I believe all of the award recipients were Americans.

Phillip Allen
10-12-2009, 09:33 AM
and as Joe would loudly say:

We won, you lost!

Bruce Taylor
10-12-2009, 10:17 AM
II think it's a good thing, don't you?

Yup. Well done, guys. You've still got it!

Andrew Craig-Bennett
10-12-2009, 10:23 AM
On a point of information, Charles Kao (half the Physics prize) holds joint British and American citizenship, Elizabeth Blackburn (Medicine) was born in Australia and Jack Szostak (Medicine) was born in.

So yes, your Universities pay better...

Kaa
10-12-2009, 10:30 AM
In an era when (it can be argued) we need more reasons to be proud of America, I think it's a good thing, don't you?

The Nobel Peace Prize is such an embarrassment, it gives a bad taste to the whole thing.

Kaa

Paul Pless
10-12-2009, 10:33 AM
I think it's a good thing, don't you?Yes... I think its a good thing.

I mentioned this before, something about this year that's pretty coo for me, is that I've been aware of, at least on a conversational level, all of the subjects that were studied or advanced by the recipients. Some years I have no idea what the awrd recipients were studying or how it advanced the human condition. This year I feel like I 'get it'.

Perhaps I'll start a thread on the economics prize later as the recipients studied market failures and successes as they pertain to the commons, especially fisheries.

JBreeze
10-12-2009, 10:33 AM
On a point of information, Charles Kao (half the Physics prize) holds joint British and American citizenship, Elizabeth Blackburn (Medicine) was born in Australia and Jack Szostak (Medicine) was born in.

So yes, your Universities pay better...

Charles Kao citizenship - add Hong Kong, too

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_K._Kao

Paul Pless
10-12-2009, 10:34 AM
Charles Kao citizenship - add Hong Kong, too

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_K._Kaoa man of the world eh:D

Andrew Craig-Bennett
10-12-2009, 10:38 AM
Charles Kao citizenship - add Hong Kong, too

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_K._Kao

My apologies; I knew that, and should have included it. Very well known figure in HK.

JBreeze
10-12-2009, 10:38 AM
a man of the world eh:D

Actually, yes! Pretty amazing that one person could play a role in such important scientific endeavors in so many countries.....maybe the scientific community is unique in that the science is recognized, rather than the culture, politics, religion and finances.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
10-12-2009, 11:15 AM
He comes from a notable scientific family - his brother has a crater on the Moon named after him, IIRC.

bobbys
10-12-2009, 11:23 AM
I wish RUSH would have won it this year and brought some dignity back to it!!.

Landmark Legal Foundation Nominates Rush Limbaugh for 2007 Nobel Peace Prize


Limbaugh called 'the foremost advocate for freedom and democracy in the world today'


LEESBURG, Va., Feb. 1 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Landmark Legal Foundation today nominated nationally syndicated radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh for the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. Limbaugh, whose daily radio show is heard by more than 20 million people on more than 600 radio stations in the United States and around the world, was nominated for the prestigious award for his "nearly two decades of tireless efforts to promote liberty, equality and opportunity for all humankind, regardless of race, creed, economic stratum or national origin. These are the only real cornerstones of just and lasting peace throughout the world," said Landmark President Mark R. Levin. "Rush Limbaugh is the foremost advocate for freedom and democracy in the world today," explained Levin. "Everyday he gives voice to the values of democratic governance, individual opportunity and the just, equal application of the rule of law -- and it is fitting that the Nobel Committee recognize the power of these ideals to build a truly peaceful world for future generations." The Nobel Peace Prize, which is given by a committee of the Norwegian Storting (the Norwegian Parliament), was created by inventor Alfred Nobel in his will in 1896 to be given to the individual or organization who "shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding of peace congresses." The first Nobel Peace Prize was awarded in 1901 to Henry Dunant and Frederic Passy. Should Limbaugh become the 2007 Nobel Laureate for Peace, he will receive the Nobel Peace Prize medal and a cash award of $10 million Norwegian Kroner (approximately $1.6 million). The prize would be presented at a ceremony in the Oslo City Hall presided over by King Harald V and Queen Sonja of Norway on December 10, 2007, the anniversary of Alfred Nobel's death. As the 2007 Nobel Laureate for Peace, Limbaugh would deliver the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize Lecture at that ceremony. Founded in 1976, Landmark Legal Foundation is the leading conservative public interest law firm in the United States. Rush Limbaugh serves as an unpaid member of Landmark's Board of Advisors. February 1, 2007 Professor Ole Danbolt Mjos Chairman, Norwegian Nobel Institute Henrik Ibsens Gate 51 NO-0255 Oslo, Norway Dear Dr. Mjos: Landmark Legal Foundation herewith submits the name of Rush Limbaugh as an unsolicited nomination for the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. We are offering this nomination for Mr. Limbaugh's nearly two decades of tireless efforts to promote liberty, equality and opportunity for all mankind, regardless of race, creed, economic stratum or national origin. We fervently believe that these are the only real cornerstones of just and lasting peace throughout the world. Rush Limbaugh is a nationally syndicated radio talk show host in the United States and one of the most popular broadcasters in the world. His daily radio show is heard on more than 600 radio stations in the United States and around the world. For 18 years he has used his show to become the foremost advocate for freedom and democracy in the world today. Everyday he gives voice to the values of democratic governance, individual opportunity and the just, equal application of the rule of law -- and it is fitting the Nobel Committee recognize the power of these ideals to build a truly peaceful world for future generations. Thank you for your thoughtful and serious consideration of this nomination. Should you require additional information, please don't hesitate to contact me. Sincerely, Mark R. Levin President

SOURCE Landmark Legal Foundation

JBreeze
10-12-2009, 11:51 AM
There you go, Bobbys!:D That's why I only read about the awards in Chemistry, Physics and Medicine. The awards in these categories are now awarded after a period of time in which the accomplishments have withstood serious scrutiny....unfortunately, the awardee also has to be still alive at the time of nomination, so Rosalind Russell never received the accolades Watson and Crick received..

The other awards are fluff....on another thread, people scoffed at the award to Arafat....well, Menachim Begin received a Peace Prize, too. I wonder how some British Veterans feel about that?

The "Nobel" Prize for economics? Krugman can't even grasp the concept of a gas mask - brilliant man!

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:vHmTrL7M4zpzIM:http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_VzG9xhJEI-Y/SsgkNsAoWwI/AAAAAAAAC0E/3fD80Vm5pSk/s400/Ketterle-Bodnar-Pamuk-Krugman-400pix.gif

(must be a mouth breather)

George.
10-12-2009, 11:58 AM
Other than the Nobel Prize for Chemistry ... I believe all of the award recipients were Americans.

I thought Obama would win the prize for chemistry.

brad9798
10-12-2009, 06:34 PM
his brother has a crater on the Moon named after him, IIRC.

I have a WHOLE star named after me ... it only cost me like $80US! Oh, and it's in the star registry, too! ;)

C. Ross
10-12-2009, 09:56 PM
Perhaps I'll start a thread on the economics prize later as the recipients studied market failures and successes as they pertain to the commons, especially fisheries.

By all means!

Heck, Williamson makes my third Nobel laureate professor. I had Hurwicz and Prescott as an undergraduate, and Williamson was at my grad school, and I heard him lecture but did not have a class with him. He and Herb Simon were hot stuff back then, and it's cool to see an award that's less about mathematics and rigor, and more about reason and insight.

carioca1232001
10-12-2009, 11:02 PM
On a point of information, Charles Kao (half the Physics prize) holds joint British and American citizenship............

There is also an awful lot of politics involved in awarding the Nobel prize.

Several years ago while browsing through a periodical entitled 'France Telecom', I was intrigued to learn that some 15 years prior to Charles Kao - early 1950īs - a Sikh student from India was the first to suggest that light be made to travel in optical guides.

In fact this was the main theme for the latterīs thesis for the M.Sc. in Physics (External London Univ. Degree) at Londonīs (then) Chelsea College of Technology.

This Sikh chap eventually crossed the Atlantic and in short order had set up a score of successful electro-optics businesses in California.

Wouldnīt have known he existed, if it were not for France Telecom !



......Elizabeth Blackburn (Medicine) was born in Australia and Jack Szostak (Medicine) was born in.

So yes, your Universities pay better...

I donīt believe it is just the pay !

I once met a young British medical researcher on a flight from NY to London, who had packed up his job at a major research centre of the BMA somewhere in the Southeast and moved to a not so well known University in Pennsylvania State, with a negligible salary incentive.

The reason for his move ?

'The research environment in the US is contagious ! One looks forward to coming into the office every morning to keep on prodding at the project one is working on. Unlike where I worked in the UK, where people would be grumpy, do little work, ...... and make plans for when they would be retiring !'

TimH
10-12-2009, 11:11 PM
I have a WHOLE star named after me ... it only cost me like $80US! Oh, and it's in the star registry, too! ;)

Now THAT is what you call getting in on the ground floor ;)

downthecreek
10-13-2009, 03:08 AM
.....
'The research environment in the US is contagious ! One looks forward to coming into the office every morning to keep on prodding at the project one is working on. Unlike where I worked in the UK, where people would be grumpy, do little work, ...... and make plans for when they would be retiring !'

And yet, in the 21st century so far the UK has racked up seven Nobel Prizes for medicine/physiology to the USA's twelve. Now, consider the difference in population size..... The USA has five times the population of the UK.

Individual stories never did prove much, I'm afraid.

Congratulations to the USA on this year's Nobel haul. But the endless background chant of "USA! USA!" that constantly rings around the world does tend to mute some of the praise from elsewhere - just as it would if an individual was for ever beating his own drum in the same way.

Paul Pless
10-13-2009, 04:23 AM
There is also an awful lot of politics involved in awarding the Nobel prize.say it ain't so :eek::rolleyes::D

Paul Pless
10-13-2009, 04:25 AM
But the endless background chant of "USA! USA!" that constantly rings around the world does tend to mute some of the praise from elsewhere - just as it would if an individual was for ever beating his own drum in the same way.just you wait till the olympics show up in town :p

carioca1232001
10-13-2009, 05:46 AM
And yet, in the 21st century so far the UK has racked up seven Nobel Prizes for medicine/physiology to the USA's twelve. Now, consider the difference in population size..... The USA has five times the population of the UK.

So why would that be ?

As a foreign student in the UK in the mid-60īs, what impressed me most was the generous - and democratic way - by which educational facilities were available for one and all.

Of the 22 electrical eng students enrolled in my class at UCL, four were foreigners, 3 were from British public schools(to include Gordonstoun and Highgate) and the remaining fifteen were the sons of blue-collar workers (foremen, supervisors etc ), i.e., the first generation, ever, in their family to proceed to university.

The latter group owed simply nothing to the public school lot, in way of competence in maths or science, although one could note several differences in terms of social graces, accent etc., in other words, trivia.

Could you point out one other country on the planet where such a sight was common at the time ?

In Brazil, a similar effect can be observed in matter of production of talented football players, and for similar reasons, although we are getting to be quite a populous country (170 million) :)



Individual stories never did prove much, I'm afraid.

I know of another case, a Swedish physicist, with 'LCD creation and research' written all over him and who has been short-listed for the Nobel several times - may get it when it is some 40 years overdue, much like Charles Kaoīs case - the b-i-l of a very good German friend of mine.

Says, 'No place like America to get bitten by the R&D bug. Quite often you have to rack your brains, only to rediscover your home address !' ;)

TomF
10-13-2009, 08:12 AM
Canada's been rushing to claim part-credit for a couple of Nobels too ... one of the 3 who shared the Medicine prize lived in Montreal for a few years and did a first degree at McGill. Same with the Physics guy, who did 3 degrees at McGill, but lived his whole adult life in the US working at Bell labs.

So for all that the Peace prize seems to have soured the whole Nobel endeavour for some of you, many of the rest of us still want to try to latch on to some faint reflection of glory ...

downthecreek
10-13-2009, 12:57 PM
just you wait till the olympics show up in town :p

The only bit that is of any interest, the sailing, will not be "in town", but in Weymouth. And, as usual, the UK will clean up. When you consider its size, the USA really doesn't do too well in the sailing, does it? :p