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paladin
10-10-2009, 08:21 PM
When I left at 05:30 this morning to see the vampires.....I turned on the slow cooker..
Poured in 1/2 gallon of water, 1 1/2 tsp salt, a couple cups of dry pinto beans, 1 T. sugar and some left over honey baked ham, cut into playing card size pieces......after 8 hours they seemed done but something was missing....first I added a T of honey, which helped a bit ....but...when I added a couple of T. of Dark brown sugar and a T of real maple surple, the flavor came out. Goes damn well good with the little dish of cornbread that I made, with added red/green peppers/jalapenos and green onions....

Phillip Allen
10-10-2009, 08:58 PM
I use brown sugar or, molasses if I have it

boylesboats
10-10-2009, 09:52 PM
I used real smoked hocks (smoked 'em over fresh cut apple wood).. that where the flavor is...

paladin
10-10-2009, 09:56 PM
didna have no hocks, and I wuz cravin' beans...the smoked ham did the job....

boylesboats
10-10-2009, 10:16 PM
didna have no hocks, and I wuz cravin' beans...the smoked ham did the job....

Really any good pieces of ham will do... hence the word (ham 'n beans)

I been cravin' fer a good pot 'o chili... waitin' fer wife to get outta kitchen sometime next few days.. so I can make some mess...:eek: :D ... I love makin' chili,... my way that is...

SMARTINSEN
10-10-2009, 10:31 PM
They sound good, but too sweet for my taste. Just 1T of dark molasses.

I like a bold taste of mustard, just a hint of a taste of clove and nutmeg--almost imperceptible--along with the the requisite salt pork, or butter if you are a vegetarian, and salt and pepper in my baked beans.

Throw in a couple of the last of the garden tomatoes cubed into 1/2" pieces if you want something different.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
10-11-2009, 04:12 AM
When I do ham shanks, great northern beans, and carrots in the slow cooker (one of my favorites, very creamy texture to the beans when done, even thought the beans are still whole), I get good results soaking the dried beans the night before in cold water in the fridge. Is it better to start the pintos dried, or were you just in a hurry? Always interested.

paladin
10-11-2009, 11:41 AM
I had soaked the beans...but I leave for dialysis at 6 a.m. so I try to make some stuff ahead of time so that all I have to do is make coffee in the mornings. I make waffles and then freeze them so that all I have to do is toss them in the oven and turn it on...by the time the coffee is ready the waffles are hot. Anything I am going to cook is usually in the slow cooker. I made a pork butt, about ten pounds last week....I was home by 1 p.m. that day so I started the smoker...hung the butt inside and let it go until about 8 p.m. when I shut it down, placed the butt in the slow cooker, and took it out the next morning. Placed it in the fridge to cool. When I came home I sliced/chopped it up and made a BBQ sauce, soaked everything and put it back in fridge. I can take out a dish of it, toss it in the microwave, and make sammiches. I usually am up for an hour or so after coming home, mostly for a quick meal because I'm a diabetic and can't eat at dialysis, feed the critters, let them outside, then when they come back in I usually get a shower and crash....I make my own salad dressings, without salt, and store them and mix them at the last minute when I need to use them. I make other sauces to go with either veggies and rice or some meat and rice, hot sandwiches with gravy or something that is relatively fast. Lately I have been making a lot of stews.

bobbys
10-11-2009, 12:51 PM
Thanks for the thread, Im gonna soak my black eyed peas{going through my southern phase} right now for Monday.

I use the crock pot every other day for soups and stew and chili and mystery meals..

Have a bread machine so i have homemade bread and soup ready for my wife when she gets home.

Its very economical to cook this way

ShagRock
10-11-2009, 01:32 PM
Nice thread...I like recipes with white Navy beans. Soak for a while in cold water...especially like variations with root vegetables..carrot, parsnip, turnip, cabbage, etc. Occasionally I add old fashioned 'corned or pickled beef'..not the canned type. Makes a great meal on those cold fall days.

Dave Gray
10-11-2009, 01:41 PM
I'm particular to Cuban style black beans. I have made this recipe a few times:
http://www.chow.com/recipes/13464.

bobbys
10-11-2009, 02:19 PM
I'm particular to Cuban style black beans. I have made this recipe a few times:
http://www.chow.com/recipes/13464..

Thats a great site i bookmarked it although i have 30000 bookmarks already, Will delete some more of my wife's sites though to make room for it!

paladin
10-11-2009, 02:26 PM
I bake my bread, and usually start the sourdough the night before after I come home from Dialysis. It takes about 20 minutes and I cover it and it's ready for the oven the next morning. I can make sourdough hamburger rolls the same way and they go very well with the pulled pork. I also have homemade sausage, sorta like Jimmy Dean but more sage and red pepper, then a slice of cheddar cheese and one scrambled egg on one of the toasted buns...fresh cuppa coffee....fast easy.....
I have a very small allowance for things like sausage or pepperoni, but I don't put the nitrites in it because the dialysis machine dunno like them...pepperoni is easy to make. In a couple of weeks mine will be ready, then I'll make some pizza sauce and bread and pig out the day before the bloodsuckers get me again.....

boylesboats
10-11-2009, 02:55 PM
Geeezus, Chuck.. you're makin' me hungry :)

paladin
10-11-2009, 05:55 PM
Go cook something. I have two choices...cook for myself or starve....or call for take-out...which ain't good for me. And it's cheaper for the critters. I wait for sales to stock the freezer. I buy frozen veggies that I use for soup or stew...and fresh veggies twice a week. I buy pork butt on sale at about $1.65 a pound...roaster chikkins, usually 6-8 pounds for about $.70 a pound etc....then I cook the chikkins and strip the meat, buy cheap ground beef and make 3-4 nice sized meat loafs with the beef and chikkin and feed it to the critters with their dry food. After the problems with animal food additives from China, I started cooking for the critters.....and with the price of canned dog and cat food outta sight, my way works out cheaper. My grocery bill is generally under $100 a week, unless I have grandcritters or other visitors.

goodbasil
10-11-2009, 06:10 PM
Would have been a decent meal if you'd left out the jalapenos. (I've got a tender tongue.)

paladin
10-11-2009, 06:12 PM
you don't load it with jalapenos, you drain them and chop them up, takes only a tablespoon or so, adds flavor, doesn't bite.

goodbasil
10-11-2009, 08:56 PM
A little bit of jalapeno is too much.
My son-in-law would like your cook'in, he loves jalapenos, more the better.
You spend $100 week on food? Your eating well.

paladin
10-11-2009, 09:20 PM
I'm also feeding two hungry critters that eat more than me, and weekly and additional 5 guests for the day, and also the cleaning ladies, as I usually make lunch for them, and some afternoon snacks. Thursdays when the cleaning lady comes I usually make a stack of waffles with butter/maple surple or fresh strawberries and whipped cream or something similar....on Tuesdays it usually scrambled eggs/omellettes and toast/sausage/bacon/ham. When I go to the clinic on Saturday, there is normally one nurse and 4 techs on duty all day, and they bring cold lunches as they can't leave the building in case of emergencies.....so I bake a dozen muffins, from apple cinnamon/orange cranberry or something else, and take a stick of butter, plastic knives and paper plates.

bobbys
10-11-2009, 09:37 PM
I'm also feeding two hungry critters that eat more than me, and weekly and additional 5 guests for the day, and also the cleaning ladies, as I usually make lunch for them, and some afternoon snacks. Thursdays when the cleaning lady comes I usually make a stack of waffles with butter/maple surple or fresh strawberries and whipped cream or something similar....on Tuesdays it usually scrambled eggs/omellettes and toast/sausage/bacon/ham. When I go to the clinic on Saturday, there is normally one nurse and 4 techs on duty all day, and they bring cold lunches as they can't leave the building in case of emergencies.....so I bake a dozen muffins, from apple cinnamon/orange cranberry or something else, and take a stick of butter, plastic knives and paper plates..

Thats nice of you, Did you know in School at least my wife's school no homemade food is allowed?

JBreeze
10-12-2009, 09:54 AM
The food costs reminds me of how I went through college on the GI bill in the late sixties on a food budget of $25 a month.:D......

You've got me there.....I had about $35/month for food in the early '70s (part-time job, so I was living high on the hog!):D

I guess the crock-pot is the contemporary device for the one appliance meal....but this is what I used for everything except the bologna on white bread sandwiches:

http://s.ecrater.com/stores/119083/4a997d1073592_119083n.jpg

(I think my 2nd one was avacado colored).

paladin
10-12-2009, 11:26 AM
In the late 60's, Thailand, I paid my housegirl between 5-7 dollars a month, and the neighbors complained that I was paying too much and ruining it for everyone else. I had at that time 1 and sometimes two wood cabinet makers working for me (another $7-8 a month each) and I gave the housegirl 2 Loi Bahts (200 baht or about 10 dollars) a week for groceries. She fed me very well, and also the craftsmen and herself. They enjoyed coming to work as they probably ate better at my house than their own. After the first year I bought the housegirl a 65cc Honda and a 90cc version for the steady cabinet maker (about 300-350 dollars each) The cabinet maker came 5-6 miles one way each day carrying his tool box, and the housegirl rode the local cyclo taxis to and from the market. I made friends for life. They worked for me for many years, completely thru my boat building.....and if either one thought someone was ripping me off, they were on the receiving end of a severe tongue lashing....I knew about it but always pretended not to....

Captain Blight
10-12-2009, 01:10 PM
I love slow-cookin. I've become a pretty serious student of the art of the braise lately; it's all about collagen control. Kinda like alchemy; you throw little bits of this and that in the pot, some unspeakable cut of gnarly meat, keep the temperature at 165* for hours, and you get something beautiful out of it.


Might make a Boeuf Bourgignonne tonight. Mmmmmm.....

paladin
10-12-2009, 05:28 PM
That was one of 3-4 recipes I have in the shadows. Although I have a really nice new oven, I have been getting back to the old days and baking in a Dutch oven...a couple of near disasters but most seem to be working out alright. I have some really old cast iron "ovens" that were all the rage when the porcelain finish came out....new fangled things that belonged to my grandmother.

Popeye
10-13-2009, 07:27 AM
swmbo asked if i wanted to keep my slow cooker , it was buried deep in the back of the cupboard .. i thought about it for a second and i said , no , bring it down to the goodwill , and the bread maker too

slow cooker is convenient but i find the flavors washed out after all day (or all night ) burbling away

as for one pot wonders .. (?) .. came up with a handsome crock of baked beans in a 'slow oven' just last week , and they were good , deep dark , sweet navy beans in mollasses and bacon

do a pretty good 'french' pot roast from time to time , the right cut roast beef in a covered pan , with root veg , 'braised' in wine and broth , lotsa black pepper

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
10-14-2009, 12:05 AM
I love the slow cooker because on a gas range, it is hard to get the light low enough to not burn things in the center, even with a good copper bottom pot. The only advantage of an electric cooktop, and a slow cooker; The slow cooker cycles on and off, never gets too hot. Also the crockery pot is anything but conductive, it heats up very slow.

Dang Chuck, your cooking is always the model I had in mind if I every opened a restaurant, I always thought of one of those joints I have seen articles about, operating out of their house, they serve lunch each day, only one thing on the menu, whatever they cook is good. A braised dish, especially smoked, very economical, hard to screw up, and will be good over a span of several hours. I might just do this someday, not to make money, too competitive, too much licensing, I'd just want to do a regular thing for a regular bunch perhaps once a week.

Yep, cooking from scratch like that, you can make a fine meal for under 5 bucks a head. Now if I can ever get into a place where I can set up a smoker.

paladin
10-14-2009, 02:48 AM
Bob...you need a "Flame Tamer"....available at most good stores that sell to the cooking crowd. Usually used aboard boats to put under a pot and over the flames to prevent exactly that problem. If you use a gas or diesel fired cooker offshore you will find that theng really handy....indespensible if you bake in a Dutch oven.

Popeye
10-14-2009, 06:50 AM
some stoves you can adjust the dial just betwixt and between the 'light' and 'low' setting for a real low flame .. or

a crumbled up ring made from tin foil placed under the pot will get you a simmer