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Jim Bow
10-05-2009, 01:40 PM
I visited a 'Show n Shine'. Thats an event wherein a large parking lot is filled with hobby vehicles. Rat Rods in one area, Mustangs in another, pickup trucks over there. All shined up, with the owners sitting in lawn chairs and talking.

There was a huge group of Harley people in one area, and a huge group of Vintage motorcycle owners in another.

Time for a huge generalization:
The Vintage owners were one heckovalot more fun than the Harley people. They were also skinnier and had more busted knuckles.

PeterSibley
10-05-2009, 05:42 PM
The vintage guys are mechanics , they LIKE their machines , not just the image .The show Harley thing is a little stange , buy a product , lots chrome ...say, "ain't it wonderful ,its got lots of chrome!"

Paul Pless
10-05-2009, 05:48 PM
I live about a mile from a very very cool biker bar. All types of riders show up. I've found most of them friendly and fun.

FWIW, the only negative experience I've ever had with a group of motorcyclists was with a touring group of BMW riders that were at the Baber Motorsports Museum at the same time I was. They were rude, pushy, and very loud mouthed. Kinda weird.

Lew Barrett
10-05-2009, 06:06 PM
The vintage guys are always the best motorcycle enthusiasts to hang with in any
town. My opinion, of course. Being a vintage guy doesn't stop you from liking later model stuff and it almost always means collector. Harley usually just means Harley.

There was a tremendous VME meeting here in Seattle for years at Teddy's That was a place to go. It was all there every month (last Wednesday of the month....first wednesday of the month?). Anybody else remember the VME meets there before it moved to Georgetown?

pefjr
10-05-2009, 06:27 PM
I prefer the female riders, you can have the guys.

Well, except the Harley women, you can have them too.

Why do you think they call those bikes "fat boy"?

Tom M.
10-05-2009, 06:43 PM
FWIW, the only negative experience I've ever had with a group of motorcyclists was with a touring group of BMW riders

I got a flat about a half a mile from the BMW shop in Fife, WA. I fixed it with a plug, rode to the shop and asked about having them mount a new one. I couldn't get the time of day from anyone there. I was riding a Vstrom, and I can only assume they weren't keen on helping me because I wasn't one of the club. The experience soured me to that shop, and to BMW folks in general. Fortunately, I was riding out of Eugene, OR, and the folks at that BMW shop are a really cool and helpful bunch, so I guess y'all aren't so bad.

pefjr
10-05-2009, 07:03 PM
I got a flat about a half a mile from the BMW shop in Fife, WA. I fixed it with a plug, rode to the shop and asked about having them mount a new one. I couldn't get the time of day from anyone there. I was riding a Vstrom, and I can only assume they weren't keen on helping me because I wasn't one of the club. The experience soured me to that shop, and to BMW folks in general. Fortunately, I was riding out of Eugene, OR, and the folks at that BMW shop are a really cool and helpful bunch, so I guess y'all aren't so bad.
The BMW mechanic is sorta like the Maytag repair man. He was probably in the back somewhere taking a nap. Not much work for a BMW mechanic. :D

Ted Hoppe
10-05-2009, 07:49 PM
Airhead BMW riders are a different bunch. They are the most welcoming motley collection of interesting misfits ever to style two wheels. As a airhead, it is in our canon to openly share knowledge, camaraderie and assistance regardless of wealth and circumstance. I have been on numerous rides with them, they always help other riders regardless of make, alway over tip the wait staff and have a good fresh iced lager in the keg at the end of the ride.

Much like the well meaning crew often representing in this forum except they show up to more than nautical flea markets, end of wakes or anticipated misfortunate lien sales.

purri
10-05-2009, 07:55 PM
Having owned everything from old HDs, a Square 4, various Trumpies, a 77 Ducati (from new and sold this year) an now a 44 U model HD Flathead the current crop of HD are no home mechanic's bike. (same as current BMWs)

Fight on!

Most current model HD owners (note "owners") are merely RUBbers.

Cuyahoga Chuck
10-05-2009, 11:19 PM
I visited a 'Show n Shine'. Thats an event wherein a large parking lot is filled with hobby vehicles. Rat Rods in one area, Mustangs in another, pickup trucks over there. All shined up, with the owners sitting in lawn chairs and talking.

There was a huge group of Harley people in one area, and a huge group of Vintage motorcycle owners in another.

Time for a huge generalization:
The Vintage owners were one heckovalot more fun than the Harley people. They were also skinnier and had more busted knuckles.

When I started going to Cycle Week in Daytona Beach back in the '70s that was the case.

One time I was cruising down A1A in Daytona and saw a Harley test ride set up behind a motel. There were all these guys lined up to take a ride. They looked mesmerized. A guy on a perfectly restored four cylinder Indian came in and parked. None of those troglodytes would even look at his ride.

Lew Barrett
10-05-2009, 11:38 PM
Having owned everything from old HDs, a Square 4, various Trumpies, a 77 Ducati (from new and sold this year) an now a 44 U model HD Flathead the current crop of HD are no home mechanic's bike. (same as current BMWs)

Fight on!

Most current model HD owners (note "owners") are merely RUBbers.


BMW opposed twins, even the oilheads, are definitely serviceable at home. You need a couple (not many) special tools, but then, you need those for most modern bikes. They are not as amenable as anything with points, mechanical distributors and carbs, but then, what is? The oilhead guys may not be riding things as simple as the airheads are, but many of them take pride in rolling their own. Some aspects of modern performance MCs require module replacement rather than repair, but that's true of everything these days. In 27000 (not much for an oilhead at all) all I had to do was adjust the valves, synch the injectors, change the oil(s), swap plugs, fix a couple of flats and change out some brake pads. All of that I did myself, and the info for most of that is available online at any one
of many sites.

BMW twins....for as long as they might build them.....remain among the more user friendly of today's bikes. But nothing sophisticated is as easy as the old stuff. Of course, it runs circles around the old stuff. The price of progress, I guess you could say.

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 12:13 AM
BMW opposed twins, even the oilheads, are definitely serviceable at home. You need a couple (not many) special tools, but then, you need those for most modern bikes. They are not as amenable as anything with points, mechanical distributors and carbs, but then, what is? The oilhead guys may not be riding things as simple as the airheads are, but many of them take pride in rolling their own. Some aspects of modern performance MCs require module replacement rather than repair, but that's true of everything these days. In 27000 (not much for an oilhead at all) all I had to do was adjust the valves, synch the injectors, change the oil(s), swap plugs, fix a couple of flats and change out some brake pads. All of that I did myself, and the info for most of that is available online at any one
of many sites.

BMW twins....for as long as they might build them.....remain among the more user friendly of today's bikes. But nothing sophisticated is as easy as the old stuff. Of course, it runs circles around the old stuff. The price of progress, I guess you could say.

Oilheads ? Do you mean the K series ?
What do you think of the earlier K75s etc .About all I can afford these days .

Bobcat
10-06-2009, 01:06 AM
Oilheads ? Do you mean the K series ?
What do you think of the earlier K75s etc .About all I can afford these days .

"Oilheads" are the post 1994 opposed twins. They're air and oil cooled. The K bikes, flat longitudinal engines with either 3 or 4 cylinders are a different kettle of fish. The K75 (a triple) is a great bike with a bullet proof motor. I put 60,000 miles on one with no mechanical issues whatsoever.

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 01:21 AM
It's the model that I've been looking at , not necessarily this one but similar .
http://cgi.ebay.com.au/BMW-K75s-1988-89-MOTORCYCLE-GRAB-A-BARGAIN-NO-RESERVE_W0QQitemZ120477100878QQcmdZViewItemQQptZAU _Motorcycles?hash=item1c0cfeab4e&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14
How do they handle compared to the R80s ? Similar manouverablity turning circle , fuel consumption etc .The motor looks pretty damn good .

Bobcat
10-06-2009, 01:37 AM
It's the model that I've been looking at , not necessarily this one but similar .
http://cgi.ebay.com.au/BMW-K75s-1988-89-MOTORCYCLE-GRAB-A-BARGAIN-NO-RESERVE_W0QQitemZ120477100878QQcmdZViewItemQQptZAU _Motorcycles?hash=item1c0cfeab4e&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14
How do they handle compared to the R80s ? Similar manouverablity turning circle , fuel consumption etc .The motor looks pretty damn good .


The handling is very good, probably better than R80, especially with upgraded suspension (aftermarket) I got about 42 to 45 mph. The power is very smooth and it's like a turbine. You turn the throttle and it just goes faster. The triples are counterbalanced and probably the smoothest BMW ever made. I have a four cylinder Kbike now and it's not as smooth.

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 02:28 AM
Thanks ....good info !

martin schulz
10-06-2009, 03:05 AM
Time for a huge generalization:
The Vintage owners were one heckovalot more fun than the Harley people. They were also skinnier and had more busted knuckles.

http://i264.photobucket.com/albums/ii188/sionnachan/Roller/zwischenstopp-neu2.jpg

http://i264.photobucket.com/albums/ii188/sionnachan/Roller/letzterHalt-neu.jpg

One guy I met during last weekends rideout had a big (double size) swollen hand which gave him troubles. He said that he was in the clinic the day before where a doc had to cut out a tooth that was buried in the hand...

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 04:00 AM
There are a variety of ways of busting one's knuckles !:D

hansp77
10-06-2009, 04:41 AM
It's the model that I've been looking at , not necessarily this one but similar .
http://cgi.ebay.com.au/BMW-K75s-1988-89-MOTORCYCLE-GRAB-A-BARGAIN-NO-RESERVE_W0QQitemZ120477100878QQcmdZViewItemQQptZAU _Motorcycles?hash=item1c0cfeab4e&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14
How do they handle compared to the R80s ? Similar manouverablity turning circle , fuel consumption etc .The motor looks pretty damn good .

Peter,
Those K's certainly are going cheap aren't they? Can't say I am that drawn to them, but from reports they do sound like a very nice smooth ride.
Since last conversation on here a while ago about the old airheads I have been researching and researching and looking long and hard...
I would love a R80g/s but they are rare as hens teeth and/or fetch stupid prices...a cult item now.
Over the last year I have only seen 2-3 go up for sale (and rapidly sell). Last one was a pretty rough looking, possibly non-original R80GSPD that went for 6K-ish:(
I just last week missed out on a very nice and affordable 77' R75/7... not exactly the offroad capability I would like but it would have made up for it in other departments (that is a bike I could really fall in love with)- and with some dual purpose tyres on it I just would have seen where it could go. A good friend bought it so at least I will get to ride it:rolleyes: (he ummed and ahh'd, committed, and then last minute decided against it and offered it to me- and I wanted it- but stupid me talked him through his cold feet and illogical rationalisations he was making because I knew he would regret it - he bought it and loves it... I am still kicking myself.... really hard...:o)

there is a decent 91 R100GS I could get, but it is a little above my budget right now and frankly a little too much bike for my wants...

Then the flipside option- and a very different one,
maybe I should just get a practical midsize japanese soul-less dual purpose... DRZ400, etc. It would probably suit my actual usage a little more, but it just isn't what tickles my fancy.


I don't know. At the moment I am just continuing to put money away, and putting the feelers out for an affordable R80g/s- good mechanicals and roughish condition would suit me fine- I don't want a showpiece one. I will see how long and patiently I can wait- whatever the case if one comes up I will have to be ready to jump at it.

(I wish I snatched that R75/7)

By the way, Peter and anyone else in Oz, if you see/hear of any R80g/s for sale, let us know;)

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 04:50 AM
Yep ,I know ,I let that st get away but i've been looking at the K75s and I'm impressed .Too much tin and plastic but I saw a stripped down one recently and it looked fine .Not a R80 but I can't afford one of those now ,as you say the $ have just really started to wind these last 2 years .

Mechanically the K75 is pretty good .Quick too .

hansp77
10-06-2009, 05:51 AM
I must have missed the R80ST- was it on Ebay? How much did it go for?
And how about a K75GS:cool:
http://www.geocities.com/fwarner_au/mc_things/k75loaded.jpg
bit of a write up how to possibly convert one here (http://www.geocities.com/fwarner_au/mc_things.htm), though this bike apparantly is one of only 4 or 5 original K75GS's in Australia.

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 06:15 AM
I had a mate with an ST , offered it to me for $2700 ,a good bike and of course I was broke .I've got the money now but the bike is sold .

I've seen them on Ebay for around $4000.

BTW ,that's a fun link ! Who'd ever think of a K75GS !:D

hansp77
10-06-2009, 06:32 AM
Damn! $2700 seems a great price in today's market. Next time you pass something like that up, don't forget to pas it on eh?;):D

Through ADVrider I met a nice old airhead nutter recently swapping a bit of gear with him (we both had the wrong sizes)- he has a nice collection of BMW's, all except the 650GS, old airheads- around 7 of them IIRC. 'Not many left' anymore as he has sold most of them off already:rolleyes:
Anyway, he is the one who has found the R100GS for me, so I am hoping if I am patient enough, as he travels in the BMW club circles and does a lot of riding around OZ he might find something else I am more interested in.

Anyway, happy hunting:)

purri
10-06-2009, 06:34 AM
FFS , I could carry more on the Darmah (with fairing incl the missus knitting, flyfishing kit and full campout kit plus 2 weeks supplies) before approaching that weight.

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 06:40 AM
Damn! $2700 seems a great price in today's market. Next time you pass something like that up, don't forget to pas it on eh?;):D

Through ADVrider I met a nice old airhead nutter recently swapping a bit of gear with him (we both had the wrong sizes)- he has a nice collection of BMW's, all except the 650GS, old airheads- around 7 of them IIRC. 'Not many left' anymore as he has sold most of them off already:rolleyes:
Anyway, he is the one who has found the R100GS for me, so I am hoping if I am patient enough, as he travels in the BMW club circles and does a lot of riding around OZ he might find something else I am more interested in.

Anyway, happy hunting:)

Boatbear ? I think he ride an R100.

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 06:41 AM
FFS , I could carry more on the Darmah (with fairing incl the missus knitting, flyfishing kit and full campout kit plus 2 weeks supplies) before approaching that weight.
Hey , a Ducati would be a joy but way out of my price range ! :rolleyes:

hansp77
10-06-2009, 07:22 AM
Boatbear ? I think he ride an R100.
Nah, I have not had the pleasure of meeting boatbear, though it was the photo of him and his R90(wasn't it?) he posted here that initially lead me down this perilous airhead path;)
This other fella I just met also had a very nice rough and ready kitted-up-for-adventure R90/6.
I'd be happy with one of those too. But again, most likely too expensive now.


Hey , a Ducati would be a joy but way out of my price range ! :rolleyes:and yeah, budgeting is a b!tch. There are more than a few bikes I would be happy with that I won't even let myself drool over. Way too many hobbies and ongoing expenses to spend up big on a bike at this point in my life- especially when something 'cheap' will bring me just as much satisfaction.

R.I.Singer30
10-06-2009, 08:48 AM
I've seen the bad/ugly side of all types of riders, it depends on the day.I agree that the classic guys are interesting, generally friendly and open,just too anal for my taste. Some beemer guys are the ultimate yuppie ayos. I have always been a "fringe rider" ,walking softly amidst some tough crowds .It seems I am usually tested by the new guys with little miles and lots of chrome. ...oofa......
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJkBreaLBEM
I added some music to the classic event that I went to a couple of weeks ago.

Tom M.
10-06-2009, 09:43 AM
The BMW mechanic is sorta like the Maytag repair man. He was probably in the back somewhere taking a nap. Not much work for a BMW mechanic. :D

Uh huh, I hear BMW tires are immune to punctures and don't wear out :D

Bobcat
10-06-2009, 11:25 AM
The handling is very good, probably better than R80, especially with upgraded suspension (aftermarket) I got about 42 to 45 mph. The power is very smooth and it's like a turbine. You turn the throttle and it just goes faster. The triples are counterbalanced and probably the smoothest BMW ever made. I have a four cylinder Kbike now and it's not as smooth.



Damn fat fingers: I got about 42 to 45 MPG, not mph. The top speed was about 105 mph indicated. There may have been more, but my desire to find out was gone...

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 04:46 PM
Damn fat fingers: I got about 42 to 45 MPG, not mph. The top speed was about 105 mph indicated. There may have been more, but my desire to find out was gone...

I figgered that , about 50mpg Oz or 5.2 litres per 100 km ,which is the way we call it now . Not that good really ...are they fuel injected or carbs ?

That's about the only downside though .

Bobcat
10-06-2009, 07:08 PM
I figgered that , about 50mpg Oz or 5.2 litres per 100 km ,which is the way we call it now . Not that good really ...are they fuel injected or carbs ?

That's about the only downside though .


Fuel injected.

Not a downside in my book.

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 07:36 PM
Badly expressed on my part .Fuel injection isn't a downside , 50mpg is .Not really impressive for such a sophisticated bike .

hansp77
10-06-2009, 08:01 PM
Uh huh, I hear BMW tires are immune to punctures and don't wear out :D
Yes, certainly. BMW's also make you much more handsome, intelligent and virulent, as well as making you one of the best riders on the planet (equal first maybe, to the other BMW riders), or so I hear. Can't wait;):D

(Seriously though, I will probably end up getting a Suzuki DRZ400- for practical purposes, it seems to tick just about all my boxes- and is quite fit for the overland into SE Asia ride I would like to do next. I will get an airhead one day though)

PeterSibley
10-06-2009, 08:08 PM
Suzuki DRZ400 ...good but spectacularly ugly ! :D

hansp77
10-06-2009, 09:17 PM
Exactly!:o You see my dilemma!
but then most dirt bikes look like garish Hitachi tools with wheels nowdays:rolleyes:

If I do get one, for practical purposes I would put some sort of small windscreen on it, such as this (BMW:rolleyes: Dakar one)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v236/241880/P1010109.jpg

but also swap for a nice big round and bright headlight like this- somehow try to make it work together (possibly take a whole windscreen and round headlight off another older bike)http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j220/mordies/DSCF7031.jpg

also of course I would like a slightly toned down colour scheme (dogdy spray job?) and probably even remove the garish stickers.... etc. Comfortable seat, safari tank...
Tone it down, beef it up a little, throw some soft bags over it and use it- whatever the case I would be trying to make it a little more pleasing to my offended eyes:D

and sorry for the thread drift Jim.

Bobcat
10-07-2009, 12:08 AM
Badly expressed on my part .Fuel injection isn't a downside , 50mpg is .Not really impressive for such a sophisticated bike .

I think motorcycles are designed for performance, not mileage. That's not bad mileage for 750 cc machine with 75 hp. Smaller bikes certainly get better mileage.

davebrown
10-07-2009, 12:24 AM
my brother has an r1100t, and i owned for a while a k12 rs. we have both had k100s. the r bikes are quirky, and agricultural. they feel like they were invented in 1918 (that point is deliberate), and they are fun--like touring in a 1959 porsche. the k bikes are light years ahead. the k12 is the greatest bike you will ever hate. the fairing and windscreen put all thenoise, bugs, dirt, and wind blast right into your eyes and ears. i have read the bike was designed to be comfortable at 120mph on the autobahn, with windblast part of the rider's support system. whether true or nonsense, the bike is a masterpiece of engineering cloaked in a positively satanic windscreen and fairing. replacing merely the screen is not enough. i finally got rid of mine and every time i see one i drool. is there a better looking bike? maybe a ducati classic...

PeterSibley
10-10-2009, 12:26 AM
Jeff , that fits into the "bloody good work category " !

PeterSibley
10-10-2009, 12:27 AM
And here's another .A bike in constant use ,shall we say ! A welcome change from spotless chrome and paint .:D:):D

http://pic40.picturetrail.com/VOL282/9443996/17245530/375728934.jpg

hansp77
10-10-2009, 05:04 AM
Great photo Peter!:D
and some people seem to think one needs a 1200GS Adventure to get out there!
Love the plumbing pipe job,
not sure if I would love that seat:eek:

PeterSibley
10-10-2009, 05:24 AM
Here's a couple more .A friend and I were talking about the perfect bike for a cross Russia and Eastern Europe ride , we decided on a Jawa ! Easy ,easy repairs and every shop knows were to get the bits .BMW ? maybe , I'll phone the factory .

http://pic40.picturetrail.com/VOL282/9443996/17245530/375741595.jpg

http://pic40.picturetrail.com/VOL282/9443996/17245530/375741594.jpg

I reckon that saddle will fit HIS bum by now !

hansp77
10-10-2009, 05:57 AM
BMW ? maybe , I'll phone the factory .
what, no support team, medics, mechanics and 4x4 full of spares like Ewan and Charlie?:rolleyes:
That seat looks a bit better from the new angle:D

PeterSibley
10-10-2009, 06:07 AM
Yep ,a pocketful of points ,a box of plugs and as many inner tubes as you can carry .Oh yeah a Russian/ English dictionary .

hansp77
10-10-2009, 06:48 AM
Russia would be cool- but I would love to get around central Asia- all the stan's- last year me and a couple of friends were trying to work out the details for a ride from India up there, but the damn thing is tricky (Carnet's are no longer available out of India- you can buy a bike there on the dodgey and ride it there, but not get it out of the country anymore- and then you have to either cross through China, which is hit or miss in that region, or up around through Pakistan and Iran- or through a weeny little bit of Afganistan- which is actually the safest part but getting through the border crossings is unlikely)
it just looked too hard for the moment.
I'm not sure if I posted a link to this thread or not in one of the past motorbike threads here:
there are a couple of good central Asian threads on ADV
here is one and a few photos from the first (of many) pages
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=202624
http://www.advrider.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=102172&stc=1&d=1170842418

http://www.advrider.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=102178&stc=1&d=1170842943

http://www.advrider.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=102183&stc=1&d=1170843532

there is some really great photos in that thread, and a few others that are worth checking out.

Bobcat
10-10-2009, 12:13 PM
Silly me for saying that K bike motors are bullet proof. My K1200 threw a rod on Wednesday. Catastrophic failure. Will need a new engine. A prior owner must have really abused the engine. Probably ran it with little or no oil and then traded it in.

At least the used motor I put in will likely be bullet proof.

As for crossing Russian, I would opt for a 650 cc Ural. Pretty reliable once sorted out and lots of parts in the Motherland.

RFNK
10-10-2009, 04:06 PM
After 3 years in Vietnam, I'm convinced that the best bike for touring SE Asia at least is a Honda Wave - its various derivations are about 90 - 125cc. They're completely reliable, repairs and parts are available everywhere (no exceptions) and they'll carry anything. The best thing about touring is getting off the main track and that's when these little bikes really come into their own. You can cross bamboo bridges without sinking (much), you can carry them over rockslides and mud and if they break down or you get a bad flat, you can carry them out on another bike! In city traffic big bikes are a major hassle too. I can do 4 hours straight on the Wave at about 70kmh which is pretty quick in Vietnam - any faster than that and the things you hit matter! There are a lot of Minsk bikes in VN too - they're the cult bike I think for young foreigners in VN. They're noisy, smokey, very unreliable and I wouldn't have one if you gave it to me but they must have something going for them! Rick

http://i470.photobucket.com/albums/rr69/rfnk/IMG_9547.jpg

http://i470.photobucket.com/albums/rr69/rfnk/IMG_9451.jpg

http://i470.photobucket.com/albums/rr69/rfnk/IMG_9441.jpg

http://i470.photobucket.com/albums/rr69/rfnk/IMG_1262.jpg

paladin
10-10-2009, 07:11 PM
My Vietnam bike for several years was a TWN.

hansp77
10-10-2009, 09:55 PM
After 3 years in Vietnam, I'm convinced that the best bike for touring SE Asia at least is a Honda Wave - its various derivations are about 90 - 125cc. They're completely reliable, repairs and parts are available everywhere (no exceptions) and they'll carry anything. The best thing about touring is getting off the main track and that's when these little bikes really come into their own. You can cross bamboo bridges without sinking (much), you can carry them over rockslides and mud and if they break down or you get a bad flat, you can carry them out on another bike! In city traffic big bikes are a major hassle too. I can do 4 hours straight on the Wave at about 70kmh which is pretty quick in Vietnam - any faster than that and the things you hit matter! There are a lot of Minsk bikes in VN too - they're the cult bike I think for young foreigners in VN. They're noisy, smokey, very unreliable and I wouldn't have one if you gave it to me but they must have something going for them! Rick


Those little hondas are certainly great in Vietnam Rick. On our ride from Hanoi doing the NW loop we had two 125cc's- IIRC I think they were the Honda copies rather than the originals but virtually the same. They were great little bikes, especially in the tight dirty twisty stuff. So much fun. Repairs on the road were easy and cheap. I weigh a bit more now than I did back then, but even then the bike was a little too strained to carry my bulk and a bit of gear. It was OK for the first bit of the journey, but by the end my bike barely made it back to Hanoi, spluttering, smoking, not happy at all. I had been flogging the life out if though:D
In Laos the Honda 250Baja's were more suited to my size. They got us into and (barely) through some some really sticky tricky stuff near Xaysomboune in the wet season. If we were on the 125's we never would have made it to Xaysomboune let alone out north up through the mountains to Phonsavan. Saying that, when bogged in deep clay, the 250Baja was an absolute pig of a thing to deal with compared to the 125's. As always it is a weigh up, postives and negatives.
All in all, I would have to agree with you in the general point I think you are making- in SE Asia, smaller is better. I liked the 250 and would be happy with that again, but for a bit more gear being carried, I like the sound of a 400 (especially if there is an australian overland leg involved).

Gotta agree with you again about the Minsk. Nasty, stinky and scary experience in the one day riding one I had on one in Hoi An. Maybe it was a bad example of the bike, maybe not. Apparently they grow on people. I wasn't tempted to give it a chance.:rolleyes:

cathouse willy
10-10-2009, 10:00 PM
I just purchased one of these and it arrived today (hack only).It's going to be mounted on my Klr 650 and with a few mods will carry the dog and some gear.With correct mounting gear it can be mounted on other bikes say a Bmw 90R or 100R. This is going to be a fun learning curve..... painless I hope.

http://www.dauntlessmotors.com/Sidecars/enduro_sidecar.htm

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-11-2009, 01:34 AM
http://www.dauntlessmotors.com/Sidecars/KLR%20650.JPG

On an R series Beemer?

Now there's brave.

PeterSibley
10-11-2009, 02:53 AM
That's a KLR Kwaka ...just normal son ,nothin'to worry about .

Try these..:D

http://pic40.picturetrail.com/VOL282/9443996/17245530/375799481.jpg

http://pic40.picturetrail.com/VOL282/9443996/17245530/375799479.jpg

For the confident !

Lucky Luke
10-11-2009, 03:01 AM
Thank you for these few more nice pics of VN, mate;)! when do you leave the misty North and come down South:)?
However, I would say that the Thai made "Dream II" of which the VN made "Wave" is not the best derivation, is a much better bike!:cool:

PeterSibley
10-11-2009, 03:03 AM
Those little hondas are certainly great in Vietnam Rick. On our ride from Hanoi doing the NW loop we had two 125cc's- IIRC I think they were the Honda copies rather than the originals but virtually the same. They were great little bikes, especially in the tight dirty twisty stuff. So much fun. Repairs on the road were easy and cheap. I weigh a bit more now than I did back then, but even then the bike was a little too strained to carry my bulk and a bit of gear. It was OK for the first bit of the journey, but by the end my bike barely made it back to Hanoi, spluttering, smoking, not happy at all. I had been flogging the life out if though:D
In Laos the Honda 250Baja's were more suited to my size. They got us into and (barely) through some some really sticky tricky stuff near Xaysomboune in the wet season. If we were on the 125's we never would have made it to Xaysomboune let alone out north up through the mountains to Phonsavan. Saying that, when bogged in deep clay, the 250Baja was an absolute pig of a thing to deal with compared to the 125's. As always it is a weigh up, postives and negatives.
All in all, I would have to agree with you in the general point I think you are making- in SE Asia, smaller is better. I liked the 250 and would be happy with that again, but for a bit more gear being carried, I like the sound of a 400 (especially if there is an australian overland leg involved).

Gotta agree with you again about the Minsk. Nasty, stinky and scary experience in the one day riding one I had on one in Hoi An. Maybe it was a bad example of the bike, maybe not. Apparently they grow on people. I wasn't tempted to give it a chance.:rolleyes:

Hans , the only long cross country runs I've done were on Cape York ,well off road and across river (undewater )on an old XL 250 Honda .Not too heavy ,not too light , just right for a hard surface under sand .Actually a very good off road bike ,although a 2 stroke 250 or 185 might (air cooled ) might be even better .

hansp77
10-11-2009, 04:34 AM
I am very tempted by a lighter simple 250cc Peter. I might be placing too much influence on the advice I have read and been given (at ADV etc) that the general 250cc is most probably too small for myself @95kg and a bit of campling/traveling gear- at least for Australian conditions (as said, in SE Asia with its general lower speeds I would be happy with a 250). I think I was also advised that not many of them have a substantial enough sub-frame to lug gear...
amongst the many impossible things I seem to want are a light-ish bike that is OK on the road, having no trouble with our highway speeds and bit to spare (and be doing it at a comfortable RPM and vibration level and fuel economy), can carry a load- hard or soft panniers, can perform reasonably well off-road, is cheap-ish (ie well sorted out for travel at under 5k if possible), is low and easy maintenance, and most importantly has a truckload of classic CHARM!:D
A compromise on a number of point is inevitable.
Of course with most of the Japanese dirt bikes, the last requirement is left poorly satisfied (to me), and the road capabilities limited in some cases. With the old airheads I am drawn to, the last requirement is well satisfied but the weight and dirt wants fall short.
If I get a dirt bike, I want to get something smaller than the 650cc capacity. There seems to be a wealth of interesting older dirtbikes/trail/enduro at around the 650 size, but I really don't want a dirt bike that big or heavy...
For an airhead, the 80G/S or ST appears a pipedream for now- I don't particularly like the other post 80's bikes and or larger bikes (R100GS etc). I've read up a bit on R65-toGS conversions, and that would be fun, but really is beyond me at this point- and often seems to rely on sourcing expensive and hard to get parts (from the R80G/S etc...).
As I seem to have developed quite a crush on them:D, if I found an affordable, mechanically sound R75/7 tomorrow, I would probably buy it, love it for a while or a long time and just make do with the limiting factors (weight and dirt ability). Same said for an affordable R80G/S- but I aint holding out on that happening. There are a few other possibilities of the slightly older airhead models that would probably do it for me too (maybe a /6 or /7 in something- non-original improvements/updates on some things- brakes etc- all the better in my book).
And so the process continues... the way I am leaning at the moment is for an old airhead. R75/7 I keep saying to myself...Silly or not, old and 'agricultural' or not, I just want one- logic be damned! Hell, I love my old BJ42 4x4, it has a soul and for a reasonable daily driver, one can't get much rougher, older and more agricultural than a 4x4 diesel virtual-tractor:rolleyes: I think an airhead would do me just fine;)
If in the unlikely event that I am really suffering from not being able to play in the dirt with it, then maybe later I could look into buying an old and very cheap dedicated small capacity dirt machine with a rec registration or something...
anyway, I am procrastinating-
back to the thesis!:(

PeterSibley
10-11-2009, 05:02 AM
The best classic dirt bike I've had was an XT 500 , it was actually very good , flickable and light .I've been halfway up a greasy clay logging track and lost traction with my full nobby rear tire and been able to roll backward and flick it 180 and away ! Try that on a BMW of any size !

The XT was however seriously horrible on the road , almost impossible to keep your feet on the pegs at 3000rpm , which , motor wise ,on a single is a number I like .

It looked great but I wasn't all that sad to sell it .The successor , the XT 550 is something of a rare bird but an excellent bike ! All the weight advantages of the 500 but with a harmonic balancer and without all the body work that the Japs started to stick on as the years went on .If you find a good one at the right price go for it .Ugly as sin though !
The one I bought turned out to be a lemon with everything that could break broken .It went back to the seller at a $300 loss and I consider myself lucky !

The old DR 500 is really good too if you can find an old one in good condition .Nice and light and not too much plastic .

Low speed torque is something that seems hard to find now ,except in the 650s .I took a Cagiva Canyon 500 for a run , a lovely road bike pretending to be a trail bike ,no toque at all under 3000 rpm ! Weird !

Keep me posted .

BTW ,I like the K75G/s link you posted .The K75 on Ebay went for $1900.

http://pic40.picturetrail.com/VOL282/9443996/17245530/375805765.jpg


Not bad , not bad at all !:D:D I wonder how he fitted that wire to the rear ?

hansp77
10-11-2009, 07:55 AM
Cheers Peter, it is great to know what older dirbikes of these capacities are the ones to look out for.

and yeah that K75GS looks pretty cool.

Here is another photo of one (I think?) from an interesting random sort of photo thread (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=483358) over at ADV, loosely Australian based in content,

http://scray.smugmug.com/photos/359920915_9dwku-L.jpg

I've only made it to page 25 of the thing so far and there are more than a few pages to go yet. Interesting viewing when I have a bit of time to spare-
such as this,

At Bayles in May.
A recreation, only 92 km on speedo.
1947 engine with a brand new 1939 piston. Kawasaki rear wheel, Honda trail bike front end and electrics, Kawasaki clutch with home cast clutch cover, Yamaha fuel tank.http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3331/3496854482_906cd7da71_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3361/3496856994_54ef8ff617_b.jpg

:D

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-11-2009, 08:01 AM
... if I found an affordable, mechanically sound R75/7 tomorrow, I would probably buy it, love it for a while or a long time and just make do with the limiting factors (weight and dirt ability).....

And so the process continues... the way I am leaning at the moment is for an old airhead. R75/7 I keep saying to myself...Silly or not, old and 'agricultural' or not, I just want one- logic be damned! ....

Sound choice - get the second disc - really.

Off road on dust - OK - on rock - OK - on dry grass OK - proper sticky mud can stop them.

hansp77
10-11-2009, 08:22 AM
Sound choice - get the second disc - really.

Off road on dust - OK - on rock - OK - on dry grass OK - proper sticky mud can stop them.

Cheers, re-enforcement and encouragement really does help this madness:D
If you don't read Ozpol, which would be understandable, you probably missed me posting this,
my friend found it and bought it in the end, with a very brief period in-between at the end where I could have snatched it but instead talked him into buying what he had fallen in love with. I have been, and am still, kicking myself:o
http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t304/hansp77/motorbike%20stuff/DSC00423.jpg

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t304/hansp77/motorbike%20stuff/DSC00424.jpg

it's got the second disc on the front... but not the second caliper yet:D
a few mods, seat, tank, staintunes, and all up a very tidy bike.
Grumble...

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-11-2009, 08:29 AM
Nice, weird choice of seat but probably comfortable enough - very strange choice of bars, the original narrow ones are a thing of joy. How many miles?

I quickly learned NEVER to park it with the fuel turned on - the carbs would occasionally have the valve stick open - the fuel would pour out and dissolve the tarmac - allowing the centrestand to sink in - the fuel eveporates, the tarmac re-hardens.....

hansp77
10-11-2009, 08:44 AM
Nice, weird choice of seat but probably comfortable enough - very strange choice of bars, the original narrow ones are a thing of joy. How many miles?

I quickly learned NEVER to park it with the fuel turned on - the carbs would occasionally have the valve stick open - the fuel would pour out and dissolve the tarmac - allowing the centrestand to sink in - the fuel eveporates, the tarmac re-hardens.....
LOL,
It came with the original seat and the original bars too- plus a few boxes of spares, workshop manual, etc, etc. The current seat is really quite comfortable but I agree- a bit odd and I would be putting the original back on.
60-ish K on the clock, but unknown if it has ticked over or not yet. There was a little bit of wear on the rear alloy brake pedal- which I have been told is a good place to look for 'original low K bikes', not much at all really. A lot of receipts indicating a lot of work done, and a previous owner who just had it sitting in a garage since he bought it as a long-term project he was never really that interested in and never got around to doing anything about it.
Grumble...:D

R.I.Singer30
10-11-2009, 08:54 AM
Silly me for saying that K bike motors are bullet proof. My K1200 threw a rod on Wednesday. Catastrophic failure. Will need a new engine. A prior owner must have really abused the engine. Probably ran it with little or no oil and then traded it in.

.

moral of story don't talk good about your bike ,your car,your boat or your woman,they will bite you in the end.;)

Small bikes are nice if your crossing rice fields but if you need to do some serious mileage you have to be able to do 90+- all dayat some point.

I paid $4200 for this in 1994 and knock on wood I'd go x country in a geart beat if the situation was here.http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b9d805b3127ccec725a501d07d00000040O00Act3LNuzbuG IPbz4W/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D550/ry%3D400/

RFNK
10-11-2009, 11:31 AM
Thank you for these few more nice pics of VN, mate;)! when do you leave the misty North and come down South:)?
However, I would say that the Thai made "Dream II" of which the VN made "Wave" is not the best derivation, is a much better bike!:cool:

I'm sure you're right Luke! All the Vietnamese seem to have a lot of respect for the Dream but baulk at the little extra cost. I've had two Yamaha Nouvos and a Wave, and a Honda 125 XL but I think the Wave was my preferred all round bike, except that it has nowhere to store camera gear under the seat! I'm not sure when I'll be down south next - I really should be going to Nha Trang and Ca Mau soon but we seem to be treading water in the project instead at the moment. I'll let you know when I'm heading that way. Let me know if you're heading to the deep north - where, as you said, the mist just this weekend is beginning to close in! Rick

Bobcat
10-11-2009, 03:28 PM
I just purchased one of these and it arrived today (hack only).It's going to be mounted on my Klr 650 and with a few mods will carry the dog and some gear.With correct mounting gear it can be mounted on other bikes say a Bmw 90R or 100R. This is going to be a fun learning curve..... painless I hope.

http://www.dauntlessmotors.com/Sidecars/enduro_sidecar.htm


I have ridden your exact rig: Dauntless endro hack on a KLR.

It's a hoot. You'll have fun.

If you don't have sidecar experience get the "yellow book" Riding the sidecar (or something like that) from Whitehorse Press.

Sidecars look like motorcycles, but they aren't

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-11-2009, 03:34 PM
I spent a season on a competition trials iron - but the people who rode sidecars were mad.
http://www.hayeshouse.me.uk/writings/SC_AB01.jpg

Bobcat
10-11-2009, 04:39 PM
Sidecarists are the tassels on the lunatic fringe of motorcycling.

Friend said sidecars are for the old, the crippled and the colorful.

I was in my thirties and able bodied when I got my first sidecar rig....:D

PeterSibley
10-11-2009, 05:58 PM
Cheers Peter, it is great to know what older dirbikes of these capacities are the ones to look out for.

and yeah that K75GS looks pretty cool.

Here is another photo of one (I think?) from an interesting random sort of photo thread (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=483358) over at ADV, loosely Australian based in content,

http://scray.smugmug.com/photos/359920915_9dwku-L.jpg

I've only made it to page 25 of the thing so far and there are more than a few pages to go yet. Interesting viewing when I have a bit of time to spare-
such as this,
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3331/3496854482_906cd7da71_b.jpg



:D

The Ariel is great !:):)

and I'm getting interested in the K75 Special thing ! UGLY! but pretty good .:D