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George Jung
10-02-2009, 01:12 PM
I posted on differnt coffee makers about a year ago; bought a Newco
OCS 12; makes a very good cuppa, but now.... it's broken. three weeks past its warranty period, of course. They used to sell for about $70, but they've been so popular, they're now closer to $200! I can get mine fixed - all I have to do is mail it back to Missouri, give them around $75, and they'll put a new heater unit in it.

Seems a bit stiff - and I dislike the idea of doing this every year.

I'm betting a few folk here have a plan B - and btw, going 'cold turkey' isn't an option. SWMBO gets a bit 'irritable' without her coffee, and I'm worse....

Any good, reliable coffeemakers ya know of? I've read it takes a heater unit of about 1500 watts to adequately heat for a maker.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-02-2009, 01:17 PM
Plan B.
http://www.gallacoffee.co.uk/acatalog/classic-cafetiere.jpg

Plan A: http://homeappliances.files.wordpress.com/2006/12/coffeeandkitchen_.jpg


Alternate approach (http://mideastfood.about.com/od/drinkscoffeetea/r/Turkishcoffee.htm)

ccmanuals
10-02-2009, 01:21 PM
George, I don't think the coffee maker as much as the coffee really makes the difference. Wife and I drink this every day (we buy the whole bean) and wouldn't drink any thing else.
http://www.cw-usa.com/common/images/products/main/coffee-eightoclock-original-whole-12oz-bags.jpg

Figment
10-02-2009, 01:23 PM
Bunn. I miss the one at my former office.

Gonzalo
10-02-2009, 01:24 PM
We have a #1 cone made by Melita. We can't get #1 filters, so we use #2, which run about $3.00 per hundred. Put the filter on top of your cup or mug, add as much coffee as you want in the filter, boil water in the kettle and pour it over the grounds. Voila! One good cup of coffee. Throw the used filter into the compost bin or trash can, rinse the cone, and you are finished.

Sometimes I wish we could make a whole pot at a time, but we don't really have counter space for a coffee maker, and the coffee is better made by the cup, anyway.

By the way, if you want to make a pot at a time, you can get a #6 filter with its own carafe, add coffee grounds to taste and water from the kettle. We have an ancient cone but not the carafe it came with. Sometimes when we have guests we make it into a thermos carafe. It is almost as easy as making it by the cup.

Gonzalo
10-02-2009, 01:28 PM
We have a French press pot that is easy to use but kind of nasty to clean. I like the filtered coffee better anyway.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
10-02-2009, 01:29 PM
I always thought the old electric percolators made the best tasting coffee.
I have one that's 30 years old and still works!


http://fantes.com/images/15527percolators.jpg


Coffee always tastes better with pie.

Popeye
10-02-2009, 01:31 PM
i live in canada , i have a metric coffee percolator

Gonzalo
10-02-2009, 01:32 PM
Percolators have a unique taste that is OK, but the filtered coffee is richer and less bitter, IMHO.

BarnacleGrim
10-02-2009, 01:34 PM
http://aleksandreia.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/mokapot2.jpg

I use one of these. Cheap and foolproof!

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-02-2009, 01:35 PM
Percs are a bit personal - some folks don't like the results, while others love it - I've got a couple of pre-war ones that work on a gas ring or camp stove.

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d165/DougReid/Image016.jpg

Uncle Duke
10-02-2009, 01:35 PM
To go the other way entirely - you could think about 'cold brew' coffee. Takes overnight to make a batch of "syrup", which you can then keep in the refrigerator and use as desired. Altering the ratio of syrup/water allows you to get any strength you like. 60%-70% less acid than any other method. And great flavor and aroma!
Toddy makes a nice system:
http://www.toddycafe.com/index.ph

Gonzalo
10-02-2009, 01:36 PM
We used Starbuck's coffee beans for brewing at home, and I like it. I don't know what they do in the stores, but I don't like it either. I never buy their brewed coffee, only the beans.

switters
10-02-2009, 01:37 PM
http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk221/switters_bucket/coffeepot.jpg

long lasting, perc to taste, don't even need electricity. no filters to remember either.

Gonzalo
10-02-2009, 01:38 PM
A coop restaurant in Minneapolis used to make cold press coffee, and it was very good. I've never tried it myself.

ccmanuals
10-02-2009, 01:40 PM
It's very hard to beat the Keurig machine, for simplicity and convenience. It might not be a good choice for someone who is a more serious afficianado of coffee, but as for me, it produces a pretty decent cup, and without any mess whatsoever.... just pop in a K-cup, hit the button, and you've got a cup of coffee about 30 seconds later.


http://www.keurig.com/images/homehero1.jpg

It's a bit more expensive, per cup, than conventional coffee makers.... around 50 cents a cup, give or take... a bit cheaper if you join Green Mountain Coffee's scheduled shipments system.

As for the quality: it doesn't quite match a fresh cup of Dunkin' Donuts coffee... but it's not bad at all. I don't like the 'Starbucks' style of coffee.... too bitter, with a burnt aroma that I find nauseating... but I'm told you can get 'french roast' K-cups that approximate it.Norm, I'm in the market for one of these instant cup machines. I've had some folks tell me that Flavia is another one to also consider. Then you also have the Tassimo which carries the Starbucks products.

BarnacleGrim
10-02-2009, 01:48 PM
Percs are a bit personal - some folks don't like the results, while others love it - I've got a couple of pre-war ones that work on a gas ring or camp stove.

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d165/DougReid/Image016.jpg
Nice, is that a kerosene stove?

I'm skeptical of percolators, but my neighbour uses one, and she makes decent coffee.

In addition to the moka pot I also use a french press. I don't like drip brew mostly because the machines are ugly and take up a lot of space. And the new ones keep breaking.

paladin
10-02-2009, 01:52 PM
I have an old (really old) cowboy coffee pot. Had it aboard for years. Nothing ever wore out or burned out. Its a drip pot with a built in filter. Just drop the coffee in the thing, set the top back on, pour bubbling, boiling water from the teakettle in the top, replace the lid, wait until it stops dripping.....fantastic coffee, easy to change the strength, toss the grounds out (or in the campfire) and rinse out the pot for next time.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-02-2009, 01:54 PM
Nice, is that a kerosene stove?...

Yup - A genuine Swedish Optimus No.5. - to tell the truth I usually prefer the coffee from the french press but you can still heat the water on the same kind of stove - no electricity needed.

Kaa
10-02-2009, 02:48 PM
It really really depends on what kind of coffee you like to drink.

Different ways to make coffee (drip vs. french press vs. turkish vs. espresso, etc. etc.) produce quite different results.

The simplest way to make coffee is Turkish, but the coffee you get is unfiltered and you need a good grinder.

French Press and Drip are quite uncomplicated as well. By the way, try http://www.aerobie.com/Products/aeropress_story.htm -- cheap, easy, and works well. Just ignore all mentions of espresso in marketing materials, they are being silly.

Espresso can get quite complicated and expensive. It doesn't sound like you're ready to jump into this particular pit yet :-)

And, of course, the coffee. May I recommend to never buy pre-ground coffee? The tasty life of ground coffee is measured in hours at most. Even the roasted whole-bean coffee has a lifetime of only about two weeks and then it starts to degrade.

In practical terms, I recommend getting a grinder and buying whole-bean coffee which has the roasting date marked on the bag.

Fresh coffee is much, much better than stale coffee.

Kaa

Flying Orca
10-02-2009, 02:53 PM
Fresh beans, grind 'em yourself, French press with water that has been brought to a boil in a kettle and left to stand for a minute or two. Inexpensive system, very good coffee, and very few failure modes other than dropping the pot.

elf
10-02-2009, 03:35 PM
Single cup coffee makers like Keurig should be available only to commercial establishments. Their result is no better than a good Melitta based drip result, and the waste is irresponsible in a society that does not offer extensive plastic recycling.

I fell for a Gevalia offer 15 years ago. Received a Krups 10-cup drip machine and a lb of some varieties of beans. Cancelled after the beans arrived and have never had to replace the machine. Stop and Rob has the 4C paper filters, for a while I used my antique wooden grinder but then broke down and bought an electric one. My choice how fine to grind, my choice how many beans to use, my choice to reheat my coffee after the first cup in my microwave. Makes 4 cups, even if it does pretend to make 10.

Don't bother to scrimp on the filters. The cheap ones don't stay crimped together. Just buy the unbeached ones. They go in the compost with the grinds.

Oyvind Snibsoer
10-02-2009, 03:53 PM
We have a #1 cone made by Melita. We can't get #1 filters, so we use #2, which run about $3.00 per hundred. Put the filter on top of your cup or mug, add as much coffee as you want in the filter, boil water in the kettle and pour it over the grounds. Voila! One good cup of coffee. Throw the used filter into the compost bin or trash can, rinse the cone, and you are finished.
...


I did some consultancy work some time ago for a local, family owned coffee company that runs a few hundred years back. I know that the owner, who is naturally very serious about his coffee, will only make coffe with a Melitta filter and boiling water from a kettle for his own personal use.

Always a pleasure to have meetings at that company, BTW. The coffee was absolutely delicious, served in small porcelain cups off a silver tray and with a selection of dark chocolate to go with it :)

paladin
10-02-2009, 03:59 PM
For a single cuppa coffee I still have my little thingy from Vietnam that sits on top of your cup, you put in the coffee, and pour boiling water on it...fresh coffee everytime and if'n ya wanna second cup just pour more water.

Gonzalo
10-02-2009, 04:28 PM
Don't bother to scrimp on the filters. The cheap ones don't stay crimped together. Just buy the unbeached ones. They go in the compost with the grinds.We don't see much difference in filters. To keep them together, fold them at the crimp line. They fit the cone better that way, and you can use the cheapest unbleached filters. We also put the filter, grounds and all, into the compost.

BarnacleGrim
10-02-2009, 04:33 PM
I did some consultancy work some time ago for a local, family owned coffee company that runs a few hundred years back. I know that the owner, who is naturally very serious about his coffee, will only make coffe with a Melitta filter and boiling water from a kettle for his own personal use.
Who, the mayor? :cool:

Gonzalo
10-02-2009, 04:35 PM
The Melita single-cup cone has five drain holes and little ridges around the drain holes, so it doesn't sit square on small-diameter cups. We prefer a no-name cone that we got from a now-defunct coffee store in St. Paul about 25 years ago. It has only one drain hole and sits well on my mug. We think that it makes better coffee because it drains more slowly through the single hole. Don't know where you can get one. We have a Melita, too, and we generally like that one, too.

Don't know where you'd get one of the no-name ones.

MiddleAgesMan
10-02-2009, 05:02 PM
I'm on my second Braun drip coffee maker in 10 years and I wouldn't have any other brand. There is one key difference between the Brauns and every other maker I've owned, and it's HUGE. The hot plate temp is 5 or 10 degrees (F) lower. That means no burned coffee if you don't drink it up in 45 minutes or so. The coffee's still good after two hours at least, maybe more.

Another nice detail is the funnel shaped baskets, much more efficient at getting all of the goody out of all of the grind.

George Jung
10-02-2009, 06:27 PM
Playing catch up after a hard day at the office.

I love cold and flu season...

We get our fresh roasted beans from Central Coast coffee out of California - family owned, very fresh, excellent service. Burr grinder. We liked the Newco because it had a heavier-duty heating element - 1400 watt - and the coffee was a bitter hotter than most makers. But I'm not impressed with their longevity or their service. I called a repair shop in Sioux Falls - they work on that brand - and they were told by the home office that they didn't have the replacement part any longer (though I'd talked with them previously - apparently they can fix the thing, if I care to ship it). So I took the thing apart - and it is built heavier than some of the junk I've seen - but certainly didn't have $200 worth of 'goodies' inside.

I'm seriously looking at 'less is more' - and a french press is tempting. But so is the Melitta filter/cup setup. I've not run across that - must not be a 'big box' item, eh? My daughter has made us Turkish coffee - I liked it - but off hand, don't know if I want to go that direction. The vacuum setup PISN posted is tempting, too - but looks like it'd need it's own dedicated space. I love coffee, but don't know if I'm up for another relationship...
Most likely, I'll say 'to hell with it' and get a Mr. Coffee, call it a day.

elf
10-02-2009, 06:30 PM
My gevalia machine, a Krups, has a single hole and conical space for the filter.

Look for a Gevalia offer in your Sunday paper, George. Or in those envelopes of coupons that come in the mail.

John Smith
10-02-2009, 06:33 PM
My experience has been that all the electric "Mr. Coffee" type units work pretty well. One has to learn how much per cup to add from machine to machine to get the taste one likes best.

My complaint with all these units is I have no control over final temp of coffee. Some units seem to make hotter coffee than others, and, unlike a toaster, there's no adjustment.

We're presently using a Black & Decker, under the cabinet unit that came with the house, and I love it.

I remember discussing coffee with the deli guy where we'd go for coffee during the day at work. He used everything identical, but coffee taste seemed to vary. We finally determined the only variable was the temp of the half & half he put in it. He'd take a quart out of the fridge, and leave it on the counter. By the time he reached bottom of the Half & Half, it was far "less cold" than it was when first opened.

He used the same brand of coffee, always pre-measured.

The other variable is the mood of the coffee drinker. Your mood, the immediate environment, and other factors, I believe, contribute to one's enjoyment of a particular cup of coffee.

SMARTINSEN
10-02-2009, 06:41 PM
I will second, third and fourth the French press method.

And I also agree that 8 O'Clock is great coffee, surely the most bang for the buck, at about $4.50/lb.

Recently we have been drinking Sumatran coffee. We make it strong, and it is guaranteed to wake you up in the morning.

Big Woody
10-02-2009, 06:46 PM
Here at my office we have three coffee machines. A Newco Enterprises commercial two pot unit, A Bunn, and a Hamilton Beach commercial unit. To be honest it all comes out tasting like charcoal when the guys put their super charred extra bold double scorched French burnt grounds in the machines.:D I sure hope that drinking burnt coffee is a fad that passes quickly. I prefer mine to taste like a lightly roasted coffee bean.

Bunn claims the water should not be boiling, just really hot.

Anyhow, Although I'm not a coffee snob, I have determined that the coffee you buy is about ten times more important than what machine you brew it in. And that's a fact Jack! :cool:

If your coffee is burnt before you put it in the machine, no amount of scientific wizardry will mask that burnt taste. The coffee grounds are not intended to act as their own charcoal filter. :D

I happen to be friends with a custom coffee roasting entrepreneur who imports and roasts his own line of custom coffees. He has enlightened me as to much of the lies, hype, and dirty secrets of the industry. Here is a link to his site:
http://www.corsaircoffee.com/coffee_origins.php

I probably might loose a friend if he knew what I am about to say.
Coffee dosent have to be expensive, or grown on some mystical mountain, and be picked one bean at a time by virgins, They just need to be tasty coffee beans properly roasted, ground, and kept from spoiling.

Besides, When the marketer of your coffee waxes eloquent about the story of how and where and by whom his coffee was grown, your bull**** meter should be pegging, because in the international coffee trade there are just a tiny fraction of a percent of marketers which buy all their coffees direct from a single source, and do not blend, and even they have to trust that their foreign supplier is telling them the truth about the virgins, and not selling him cheaper beans from annother source blended in with his premium beans. Bottom line: Coffee beans are not traceable and if you did not pick them youself you cannot guarantee with absolute certainty where that bean was grown. Just because you buy your beans from a Sumatran coffee farmer, does not insure that he's not also importing cheaper beans from elsewhere and selling them as his own.

George Jung
10-02-2009, 06:49 PM
I noticed 8 O'clock is sold at Sam's club and Walmart, in SD. I'm surprised it tastes so good - I wouldn't think the turnover would be fast enough to maintain freshness.

I wonder if Gevalia still promotes a Krups - the makers I've seen lately seem a 'step down' from what used to be made. I suspect your model is built a bit better, Emily. A similar comment was made on the green coffee bean forum, and that is one seriouis bunch of coffee drinkers!

Weekend job - find a replacement (even if it's a stop gap move).

George Jung
10-02-2009, 06:52 PM
Ah, Woody!

Truer words have ne'er been spoke.

BarnacleGrim
10-02-2009, 06:52 PM
Recently we have been drinking Sumatran coffee. We make it strong, and it is guaranteed to wake you up in the morning.
Sumatran, my favourite! Haven't had any of that in a long time, though. There is a really nice Italian-style caffè in Gothenburg called Da Matteo, where they select beans from all over the world and either sell or serve. And I swear, they have the absolute best Latte in town!

elf
10-02-2009, 07:16 PM
8 O'Clock coffee was A&P's house brand when I was a kid. I suspect it got commandeered by someone else because it was worth saving. My mother drank only it.

I prefer Green Mountain and Cafe Altura, which I get from my food coop. My beans are stored in the freezer but I blend them half French Roast and half something else, depending on my sense of humor with something from whereever I happen to find it in my travels. I just finished a batch of French Roast and Hazelnut, will be starting a blend of French Roast and Chocolate Almond.

Sure, I like my caffeine, but there's no point being anal or dour about it.

2MeterTroll
10-02-2009, 07:23 PM
cast iron skillet, green beans, a little heat toast to the roast you like put in grinder grind up fine toss in pot of boiling water boil for 10 min.
add one cup ice water pour off the clear coffee.

S/V Laura Ellen
10-02-2009, 08:23 PM
Espresso...double shot
25 second extraction time for 2 - 2.25 oz
30 lbs tamp pressure
14 g of very fine coffee, freshly roasted, grinder adjusted to get the right extraction time
water temp between 195 and 205

Big Woody
10-02-2009, 08:44 PM
FYI Almost half of the world's coffee is grown in Brazil and Vietnam.
I'm not aware of much coffee being marketed as Brazilian or Vietnamese. Apparently marketers don't feel that those two productive coffee growing regions are then very exclusive due to the massive tonnage of beans they produce each year.
So who then drinks coffee from Brazil and Vietnam? If you drink coffee, the answer is you. When You pay extra for that "Sumatran blend", the word blend is the catch that allows the blender to blend whatever the heck he wants along with some coffee beans from Indonesia and sell it to you. But don't worry, the real key to the earthy and musty taste of traditional Sumatran coffee is that it is really hard to dry the beans over there with out getting a lot of mildew and spoilage! A secret you probably didn't want to know. :D Fortunately mildew and spoilage can happen in Brazil and Vietnam also, so there will always be plenty of Sumatran blend coffee as long as you're willing to pay a premium for it. :)

Kaa
10-02-2009, 08:52 PM
Espresso...double shot
25 second extraction time for 2 - 2.25 oz
30 lbs tamp pressure
14 g of very fine coffee, freshly roasted, grinder adjusted to get the right extraction time
water temp between 195 and 205

You forgot to mention about $1500-$2000 for a decent E61 espresso machine (or at least something PIDded) :D

Kaa

paladin
10-02-2009, 08:54 PM
My Kona comes from a small family owned farm....and when I order it they tell me it was roasted within 48 hours of shipping.....
My everyday run of the mill coffee is a bit different. Every month I get 3-4 pounds from Vietnam.....From the same family that grew it and where I would buy from every other week. I like it better than what you get in the U.S. but it's a bit strong to my taste if you use it straight....I buy UBAN at the local Food Lion...cheap coffee...but I use one scoop of UBAN and one of my french roast Vietnamese coffee....Tea comes from the same source. .....and it's as cheap/expensive as the major brands in the grocery store.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
10-02-2009, 09:16 PM
Buy good quality beans, keep them whole in the freezer, and grind them right before brewing. I keep on grinding until they are dust, about 7-8 seconds, because the paper filters take it all out. A strong brew, then lots of milk, cafe au lait style, works better for me than brewing it weak, lots more flavor, and the milk cuts the acidity.

You don't need to spend much on a coffee grinder, I used my little mini prep food processor with the blade reversed so as not to dull it, until someone gave me a dedicated grinder.

I did love Starbucks Yukon Blend, but have found a substitute in Trader Joe's French Roast. (There has been a backlash against the coffee behemoth for gobbling up the smaller guys.) But experiment, try new things.

I also use a filter cone, it's the same mechanics as a drip maker, just heating the water separate and dispensing directly into the mug. Incredibly simple, great taste, super easy clean up. The unbleached (brown) filter papers are available widely nearly everywhere, even Walmart.

Look for a ceramic or porcelain filter cone instead of plastic, they are about the same cost if you look around. My little no-name one I think ran $4.50 at a high-end kitchen store nearby, I see the same price online for the one pictured below. A bigger cone is more convenient, and I think about $10, you can dump in the entire cup's worth of hot water and leave it, but I find something theraputic about having to pour in the water little by little. I have a matching white ceramic mug, and together, it gives my life a little class in the morning. :)

I have a high quality drip maker with large carafe, I only use when I entertain.


http://www.fantes.com/images/120291coffee_manualdrip.jpg

Sets are available:
http://www.fantes.com/images/120290coffee_manualdrip.jpg

I have also been thinking about getting a Vietnamese style version, which is a small stainless steel cup with *tiny* holes, no other filter, so even though it is flat inside, the water takes a long time to seep through. If you have had coffee at a Vietnamese place, especially at the table, it was probably using one of these.

http://www.fantes.com/images/18946coffeemaker.jpg

Dang, now I'm in the mood for a Vietnamese iced coffee and I don't have the condensed milk.

S/V Laura Ellen
10-02-2009, 09:19 PM
You forgot to mention about $1500-$2000 for a decent E61 espresso machine (or at least something PIDded) :D

Kaa


$100 used machine and I just temperature surf (drain off some water to get the heating element to come on, then the pull the shot when the ready light comes back on) to get the right temp.
A PID for my machine is $150, it would remove the need to temp surf.

PatCox
10-02-2009, 09:28 PM
I keep hearing that the french press is best, I never tried one. I think drip brewed is overall the easiest, most convenient, and its good, thats why the Bunn's are good. But with good coffee, I don't see why a Mr. Coffee is not as good as pouring the water over a filter of coffee any other way, its just convenient, heats the water and pours it slowly over the grounds.

Good coffee is of course essential, and I still think A&P is as good as anything, Starbucks coffee is burnt and nasty. The beans should be shiny and brown, not oily and black.

Good coffee is important, but people overlook good water, and I think most tap water has just the bit of chlorine, just the tiniest bit, that doesn't sit right with coffee, its worth filling your coffee maker with springwater, good bottled water.

And I have to say, the Keurig is fantastic, truly, fantastic, its pressure brewed, not just dripped, and there is something about the method, and the freshness of each cup, never bitter, rich, nice, my only thought is, that if instead of using the little cups, who knows how long ago the coffee was ground, if you could put good fresh coffee in the kuerig, it would be even better.

George Jung
10-02-2009, 09:58 PM
Interesting to me - the perceptions of what makes a good bean. And have you noticed they continue to vacillate over freezing/not freezing the beans? Now I'm told freezing/refrigerating is a no-no; place in a vacuum container, instead. Not sure how that impacts the taste (suspect I'd be unable to tell).

I'd agree on the water; probably on the Mr. Coffee - except I do believe that having the water hot enough makes a difference - and I don't think the Mr. gets there.

oznabrag
10-02-2009, 10:08 PM
cast iron skillet, green beans, a little heat toast to the roast you like put in grinder grind up fine toss in pot of boiling water boil for 10 min.
add one cup ice water pour off the clear coffee.

My Granddad was an honorary Mormon, by virtue of having surveyed a whole lot of Utah in the 30s. The guide he hired was bent on converting him to Mormon, but Charles held steadfastly to the Episcopalian Doctrine, and finally the guide gave up and simply named him an honorary Mormon to avoid any further unpleasantness.

The point of this is that Ol' Gooberhead, the Mormon muleskinner, imparted his method of making coffee to my family.

1) Kick the fire up right smart and get it to draw.

2) Stuff an eight-quart, enamelled coffee pot into the coals, and bring it to a vigorous boil.

3) Measure out a heaping tablespoon of ground coffee per cup, and a tablespoon for the pot and when the water its a vigorous boil, add the coffee and REMOVE FROM HEAT!

4) DO NOT STIR.

5) Allow to steep for about 10 minutes, but do not stir before the bulk of the grounds have sunk to the bottom of the pot.

6) STIR.

(be kind to yourself, and wait a few minutes;))

7) Strain to serve.

.
.
.

My Mama's coffee'll make yer eye's roll back in yer head, ol' son.:)

George Jung
10-02-2009, 10:20 PM
My Mama's coffee'll make yer eye's roll back in yer head, ol' son.:)


That's what I'm going for....;)

Thanks. I'll pass it along to SWMBO.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
10-02-2009, 10:23 PM
This thread has legs.

Glen Longino
10-02-2009, 10:31 PM
That's what I'm going for....;)

Thanks. I'll pass it along to SWMBO.

Don't do it, George! SWMBO will never trust you again.
That coffee John T is talking about is at least twice too strong for average humans.
Obviously his family has built up a tolerance for that sludge, er, I mean coffee, that has been passed along in their genes.;)
John T eats his coffee with a spoon. Is that really what you want?:rolleyes:

Kaa
10-02-2009, 10:33 PM
1) Kick the fire up right smart and get it to draw.

2) Stuff an eight-quart, enamelled coffee pot into the coals, and bring it to a vigorous boil.

3) Measure out a heaping tablespoon of ground coffee per cup, and a tablespoon for the pot and when the water its a vigorous boil, add the coffee and REMOVE FROM HEAT!

4) DO NOT STIR.

5) Allow to steep for about 10 minutes, but do not stir before the bulk of the grounds have sunk to the bottom of the pot.

6) STIR.

(be kind to yourself, and wait a few minutes;))

7) Strain to serve.



That's kinda Texas-sized Turkish coffee :D

Kaa

Gonzalo
10-02-2009, 11:10 PM
...the Melitta filter/cup setup. I've not run across that - must not be a 'big box' item, eh?I googled up this site: http://www.fantes.com/coffee-manualdrip.html sells the single cup drip cones, in various styles and materials. Prices look good compared to the specialty coffee stores where I bought mine. Cooking departments of big boxes might have them, too.

Oyvind Snibsoer
10-04-2009, 08:33 AM
Who, the mayor? :cool:

Yup :)

LeeG
10-04-2009, 08:45 AM
Peets coffee

George Jung
10-04-2009, 08:48 AM
Well, we hit the retail stores yesterday, looking for a Plan B, so to speak. Lotsa junk being sold out there!

For now, I'm using a cone/filter - mighty fine cuppa! We picked up a Mr. Coffee, 'in case' - it's going back (I just don't think I can put up with it!). I'll either fix my 'special' maker, or get something else - maybe a Bunn or one of the other makes with a good heater.

Thanks - kinda fun thread, eh?

Glen - what do you mean, 'again'?

I might be one joke past that one already...:D

MiddleAgesMan
10-04-2009, 05:58 PM
Worrying about whether a particular maker gets water hotter than another isn't realistic. Water boils at 212 at sea level and won't get any hotter. In order for your maker to get the water up and out of the reservoir it must be brought to a boil. Some brands may insulate the tubing better than others so that the first few drips are closer to 212 than in a lesser machine, but once that tubing has been subjected to a half-ounce of boiling water it's going to deliver water as hot as any other.

As I mentioned earlier, it's the temp of the hot plate that makes a real difference. If too hot, the coffee burns and tastes bad if not consumed within a few minutes. The Braun machines hot plates will not burn your coffee because it is stored in the pot at a lower temp.

Paul Pless
10-04-2009, 06:50 PM
As I mentioned earlier, it's the temp of the hot plate that makes a real difference. If too hot, the coffee burns and tastes bad if not consumed within a few minutes. The Braun machines hot plates will not burn your coffee because it is stored in the pot at a lower temp.My Krupp's warmer is adjustable for both temp and duration. I like my Krupp very much, except that it is difficult to clean. It be nice if the resevoir were detachable so that this side of the machine could be periodicaly cleaned easily.

Kaa
10-04-2009, 06:54 PM
Worrying about whether a particular maker gets water hotter than another isn't realistic. Water boils at 212 at sea level and won't get any hotter. In order for your maker to get the water up and out of the reservoir it must be brought to a boil. Some brands may insulate the tubing better than others so that the first few drips are closer to 212 than in a lesser machine, but once that tubing has been subjected to a half-ounce of boiling water it's going to deliver water as hot as any other.

Actually, you do NOT want to pour boiling water over coffee.

The proper temperature of water that hits the coffee grinds is subject to some debate, but is generally considered to be 200 F plus minus five degrees. Connaisseurs adjust the precise temperature to suit a particular coffee (depending on the origin, roast, etc.) :-)

Kaa

TimH
10-04-2009, 07:04 PM
We have this. It grinds the whole beans and brews the coffee automatically.

http://s7.sears.com/is/image/Sears/00826154000?qlt=90,0&resMode=sharp&op_usm=0.9,0.5,0,0


The coffee?

Costco Columbian is our daily grind. Sometimes we splurge on a bag of Kona.

Yeadon
10-04-2009, 07:30 PM
http://aleksandreia.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/mokapot2.jpg

I use one of these. Cheap and foolproof!

My all-time favorite ... works well over an MSR camp stove, too.

MiddleAgesMan
10-04-2009, 08:08 PM
Actually, you do NOT want to pour boiling water over coffee.

The proper temperature of water that hits the coffee grinds is subject to some debate, but is generally considered to be 200 F plus minus five degrees. Connaisseurs adjust the precise temperature to suit a particular coffee (depending on the origin, roast, etc.) :-)

Kaa

...200-205F...which is what the water temp will be in a drip machine by the time it is spewed out over the grounds--in ALL machines. It might be a tad higher at sea level and a tad lower in Denver but, as I said, you can't change the temp of boiling water... unless you pressurize it or boil it in a vacuum.

George Jung
10-04-2009, 09:07 PM
MAM - interesting insights - sounds right (though I've heard that debated, as well). So perc my coffee, pour into a carafe, and I should be set, right?

Might as well stir this up a bit -

what's your take on freezing coffee (if you're not going to use it immediately)?

willmarsh3
10-04-2009, 09:32 PM
I'll attest to the durability of the Krupps (or at least that circa 1993). I've made probably over 3000 cappuccinos with mine so far. I even left it on once when I went to work. The machine was none the worse for wear. That concerned me so I put a lamp timer on it to keep that from happening again.
It's a double unit - left side espresso and right percolator style. The bottom is inconvenient to clean - I soak a sponge in it a few times to drain it out and then wipe it down. As for temperature I'd reckon the water gets a little over 212 F since it is pressurized to 5 psi or so for steaming the milk.

MiddleAgesMan
10-04-2009, 09:47 PM
I currently keep my coffee in the fridge. I used to keep it in the freezer but only because the freezer had more room at that time. I buy it in quantity and it goes bad sitting out at room temp, in my experience. (Even when I had a room mate I was the only coffee drinker in the house. If you buy only one or two pounds at a time and several people are drinking it, room temp storage is probably just fine.)

Paul G.
10-05-2009, 04:31 AM
When you are ready for the best coffee experience there is only one....

http://cw-gebrauchtgeraete.at/files/ges_31.jpg

The timeless La Cimbali Junior. and you do need the grinder to go with it otherwise you are completely wasting your time and money.

Big Woody
10-05-2009, 09:16 PM
I made some room temperature brewed coffee over the weekend (it was my first time) and then refrigerated it and served it over frozen coffee cubes with cream and brown sugar. It was quite good! I do like iced coffee drinks better than the hot, except when it is really cold outside.

Chip-skiff
10-05-2009, 09:55 PM
http://aleksandreia.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/mokapot2.jpg

I use one of these. Cheap and foolproof!

Me, too. A 4-cup espresso pot (tiny cups) yields 2/3 in my insulated mug. Top with hot water.

In NZ they call it a long black, and so do I. They also make flat whites (don't arsk).

Second choice: French Press, with the coffee that doesn't go into your mug kept in a pre-warmed vacuum bottle. Both methods work well with any sort of stove. Disadvantage is cleaning the pot.

On the road, we often use those Melitta funnels with #2 or #4 filters. The brew's not as good, but it's more convenient.

Kaa
10-05-2009, 11:40 PM
When you are ready for the best coffee experience there is only one....

I can get a boat for the price of that thing... :D

Kaa

Nicholas Carey
10-06-2009, 01:32 AM
Peets coffeeJunk. Worse than Starbux. Like making coffee with the contents of somebody's ashtray. And then over-brewing it.

Try ordering from J. Martinez in Atlanta. IMHO, one of the best roasters in the country. http://www.martinezfinecoffees.com/

Try Ethiopian Harrar or Yrgacheffe (if you can find it). Tiny beans. Winey sort of sourness to it. Great stuff. Genuine Yemeni Mocha Mattari (if you can get it) is interesting, too. Straight coffee that tastes like somebody doped it with chocolate.

Caffé d'Arte (http://www.caffedarte.com/) in Seattle roasts some mighty fine coffee. Try some of their alderwood-roasted blends (http://www.caffedarte.com/alderwoodblends.html). Another good roaster is Zoka Coffee and Tea (http://www.zokacoffee.com). Stumptown Coffee Roasters (http://www.stumptowncoffee.com/) also seems to have lots of fans, but I can't say that I've tried it.

Nobody has suggested Chemex (http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/) yet. Doesn't get much simpler than this:

http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/images/CM-8%202006.jpg (http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/)

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
10-06-2009, 02:41 AM
When you are ready for the best coffee experience there is only one....

http://cw-gebrauchtgeraete.at/files/ges_31.jpg

The timeless La Cimbali Junior. and you do need the grinder to go with it otherwise you are completely wasting your time and money.

And it does scrambled eggs.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
10-06-2009, 05:00 AM
Nobody has suggested Chemex (http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/) yet. Doesn't get much simpler than this:

http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/images/CM-8%202006.jpg (http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/)

There is no functional explanation on the website, except to claim:

"The Chemex® coffeemaker, together with Chemex-Bonded® Coffee Filter, makes perfect coffee. Clear, pure, flavorful and without bitterness or sediment every time. The coffee only comes in contact with the scientifically designed filter and non-porous glass. With the Chemex® method, you can make coffee as strong as you like without bitterness. Perfect for iced coffee and coffee flavoring for gourmet recipes. Because of its purity, Chemex® brewed coffee can be covered and stored in the refrigerator for reheating...without losing its flavor!

This merging of form and function came out of Chemist Peter Schlumbohm's taste for fine flavor. Applying the techniques used to insure laboratory purity, he set out to brew what may have been the first cup of truly, clear, full-bodied coffee - free of undesirable fats, oils, sediment and most of all...bitterness.


For five decades the coffeemaker that was once available to only a circle of acquaintances has been enjoyed by connoisseurs around the world. But, the Chemex® coffeemaker's greatest distinction is that once it brews coffee to the most exacting personal requirements, the filter and grounds are removed in a single package, leaving the carafe as at home with fine china as it is with the first cup of morning coffee."

Is this any different from just using a filter cone with a paper filter? Their filters are paper; are they superior to conventional paper filters? The prices are not too bad, it's just that the claims seem steeper than the miracle spark plugs in the JC Whitney catalog. :D

Nicholas Carey
10-06-2009, 02:15 PM
There is no functional explanation on the website, except to claim...[elided]

Is this any different from just using a filter cone with a paper filter? Their filters are paper; are they superior to conventional paper filters? The prices are not too bad, it's just that the claims seem steeper than the miracle spark plugs in the JC Whitney catalog. :D

Chemex filters are circular and made of (basically) laboratory filter paper. They get folded into a conical shape with the result that the filter is 3 layers thick.

Plus you get a modern design classic.

They do make mighty nice coffee.

bobbys
10-06-2009, 02:29 PM
In the morn when the sun comes up.

My baby brings me coffee in my favorite cup.

Hallelujah i just love her so......

The trail boss gives me a kick and i gets up outta my roll and heads over to Cookie who pours me a cuppa joe from the chuck wagon and if im nice gives me a lump of sugar before i tend to the doggies......


My partner keeps watch and fires up the diesel stove for a pot of coffee, However we set out our lines first, You cant catch Salmon without the hooks in the water.....


I meet my Buddy at PALS diner for a cuppa cawwffee before we head out to "collect" from a few bums , Hes the tough guy and likes to twist there arms backwards while i "reason" with them that if youse dunno pay us the next guys are not gonna be so nice.

OK i just have a plastic thing with a paper filter but these storys sound better, I made up the cowboy one.:)

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
10-07-2009, 02:09 AM
Chemex filters are circular and made of (basically) laboratory filter paper. They get folded into a conical shape with the result that the filter is 3 layers thick.

Plus you get a modern design classic.

They do make mighty nice coffee.

Ha! Does it come with a vacuum pump too? This has to be the most chem-nerd coffee maker in existence. I should have guessed with it shaped like an Erlenmeyer flask*. I can dig it. :cool:

* Not to be confused with a Fleaker.

LeeG
10-07-2009, 02:37 AM
I keep hearing that the french press is best, I never tried one. .

I've accumulated too many broken beakers and plungers and the coffee doesn't taste as good as filtered.

Nicholas Carey
10-07-2009, 02:40 AM
Ha! Does it come with a vacuum pump too? This has to be the most chem-nerd coffee maker in existence. I should have guessed with it shaped like an Erlenmeyer flask*. I can dig it. :cool:For a vacuum pump, you'll need a Napier (vacuum) brewer. They're supposed to be the be-all and end-all of coffee making, but a bit on the Rube Goldberg end of things. They've been around since the 1840s. Here's a Yama::

http://coffeegeek.com/images/39040/steeptime.jpg

Details can be found at the Coffee Geek (http://coffeegeek.com/guides/siphoncoffee), but the basic method goes something like this:

1. put filter in top globe.
2. put ground coffee in top globe.
3. Water goes into bottom globe.
4. Assemble the apparatus.
5. Light the alcohol burner
6. When the water boils, it and the air above it expand, driving the boiling water into the top chamber.
6. Allow the coffee to steep for the prerequisite amount of time.
7. Extinguish the alcohol burner.
8. As the apparatus cools down, a vacuum is formed in the lower globe, which slurps the freshly brewed coffee through the filter and into the bottom chamber.
9. Remove the top half of the apparatus.
10. Enjoy your coffee.

LeeG
10-07-2009, 02:53 AM
Junk. Worse than Starbux. Like making coffee with the contents of somebody's ashtray. And then over-brewing it.

Try ordering from J. Martinez in Atlanta. IMHO, one of the best roasters in the country. http://www.martinezfinecoffees.com/

Try Ethiopian Harrar or Yrgacheffe (if you can find it). Tiny beans. Winey sort of sourness to it. Great stuff. Genuine Yemeni Mocha Mattari (if you can get it) is interesting, too. Straight coffee that tastes like somebody doped it with chocolate.

Caffé d'Arte (http://www.caffedarte.com/) in Seattle roasts some mighty fine coffee. Try some of their alderwood-roasted blends (http://www.caffedarte.com/alderwoodblends.html). Another good roaster is Zoka Coffee and Tea (http://www.zokacoffee.com). Stumptown Coffee Roasters (http://www.stumptowncoffee.com/) also seems to have lots of fans, but I can't say that I've tried it.

Nobody has suggested Chemex (http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/) yet. Doesn't get much simpler than this:

http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/images/CM-8%202006.jpg (http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/)

odd given D' Artes focus on espresso which is decidely a highly roasted bean with lotso carbon to it. Are you speaking of all Peets coffees? I have positive associations with Peets served at their stores and the method of brewing it.

RFNK
10-07-2009, 03:09 AM
http://www.fantes.com/images/18946coffeemaker.jpg

Dang, now I'm in the mood for a Vietnamese iced coffee and I don't have the condensed milk.

These things really are the greatest and they cost about $1 in Vietnam. You just put ground coffee in the metal cup, press the strainer down onto that, add hot water and let it drip through into your cup. It's so simple and effective that I wonder why everyone doesn't do it this way.

Vietnamese coffee has a really distinctive flavour - people keep telling me what species it is but I keep forgetting. Anyway, although VN is the world's second largest coffee producer, you don't see it much on the shelves outside VN, I'm told, because it nearly all goes to the instant coffee manufacturers i.e., Nestle I guess! Vietnamese drink very strong coffee. They often add sweetened condensed milk to it and drink it hot like that (I call it coffee medicine) or pour it over ice for iced coffee, with or without the condensed milk. Rick

LeeG
10-07-2009, 03:14 AM
is there anything better than a strong cup of coffee on the boat and a tablespoon of evaporated milk?

oznabrag
10-07-2009, 07:59 AM
if yer momma's coffee can do that she could raise the dead on a Monday.

My coffee is confirmed to raise the dead any day of the week and twice on Monday's. just the fumes corrode silver spoons ;) I tend to roast to a fine dark smoky flavor; course it helps in the raise the dead if you add a couple sticks of cinn and a few small cayenne peppers. pry those gummy eyes wide open.

So that's it!

When I was a kid, I always wondered what those zombies were doing hanging around the house like that!

It was Mom's coffee!

oznabrag
10-07-2009, 06:27 PM
See there now just cause you know how its done the magic hasn't gone away.;)

On a serious note i have a collection of old cook books from round the early and mid 1800's that say almost exactly the recipe from that mormon. :)
it can and does make a wicked cup.

Nope, the magic is still there. :D

A lot of folks would say that putting the coffee into boiling water is a bad thing, and it is if you stir, but the coffee floats on top of the pot and slowly sinks. By the time the pot is off the fire for a few seconds it has quit boiling, so you are actually pretty safe on that score.

Very strong cuppa joe.