PDA

View Full Version : Lunkhead



John of Phoenix
09-28-2009, 09:37 AM
Lunkhead (from another thread).

Now there's a word you just don't see much anymore and it's a real shame. It's ambiguous and precise at the same time. No one actually knows what a lunkhead is but everyone knows precisely what it means.

Phillip Allen
09-28-2009, 09:39 AM
:) .

Tom Montgomery
09-28-2009, 05:29 PM
It has an comical/affectionate feel to it, doesn't it? It's the sort of thing you might call your brother.

oznabrag
09-28-2009, 05:37 PM
It has an comical/affectionate feel to it, doesn't it? It's the sort of thing you might call your brother.

Well yeah, if he weren't such a durn lunkhead!

John B
09-28-2009, 06:25 PM
I've been wondering about 'Ornery' since seeing Toms sig.
Whats the origin of that do you think.. contraction of ordinary? bit of a meaning shift along the years?

Milo Christensen
09-28-2009, 06:55 PM
Lunkhead. (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=lunk)

Ornery. (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=ornery)

John B
09-28-2009, 08:21 PM
Ornery..
1816, Amer.Eng. dialectal contraction of ordinary. "Commonplace," hence "of poor quality, coarse, ugly." By c.1860 the sense had evolved to "mean, cantankerous."

yeeha. got one right. what do I win?

Bit like the meaning shift of bodger or bodge job. Used to mean the carpenter who plugged up the shot holes and war damage with everything and anything at his disposal, and saving the ship by doing so. Now its shoddy workmanship.

oznabrag
09-28-2009, 08:36 PM
yeeha. got one right. what do I win?

Bit like the meaning shift of bodger or bodge job. Used to mean the carpenter who plugged up the shot holes and war damage with everything and anything at his disposal, and saving the ship by doing so. Now its shoddy workmanship.

Uhh...All the info I can find indicates that a Bodger is a workman who makes the turned parts of a Windsor chair. More specifically, he makes them with a wooden-bed, spring-pole lathe and, most likely, he makes them right there in the woods, bundles them up, and sells them to a chair-maker.

John B
09-28-2009, 09:05 PM
Uhh...All the info I can find indicates that a Bodger is a workman who makes the turned parts of a Windsor chair. More specifically, he makes them with a wooden-bed, spring-pole lathe and, most likely, he makes them right there in the woods, bundles them up, and sells them to a chair-maker.


See thats really interesting , because I've only heard it used nautically.

bodge: 1 v make a bit of a haphazard job of something 2 n something cobbled together. A “bodger” was originally a craftsman who worked on a green-wood lathe, but this information is of almost no help at all because the word “bodger” still rather implies that such a person was “bodging” something.


But plugging shotholes is best done with big plugs eh... So I can imagine some crossover there..;)

oznabrag
09-28-2009, 09:25 PM
See thats really interesting , because I've only heard it used nautically.


But plugging shotholes is best done with big plugs eh... So I can imagine some crossover there..;)

Yeah, I thought about turning plugs for shot-holes in less-than-ideal conditions. The British Navy, in it's all-powerful, beneficient wisdom, probably saw this solution and accosted some poor bodger, who was so 'impressed' that he went to work for them! ;)

John B
09-28-2009, 09:33 PM
impressed Nice.:D

Can we do Pillock now. ( bit of a seg back to lunkhead)

oznabrag
09-28-2009, 09:53 PM
Go for it, John!

John B
09-28-2009, 10:01 PM
I dunno, just sounds good( like lunkhead):) not that I've ever heard anyone actually call someone a lunkhead..


" youuuuu pilllock!"

feels good.

Milo's search etymology thing says no matches found.

Canoez
09-28-2009, 10:04 PM
If you were closer to Bahstahn... (That's Boston for the rest of you.) You would find the epithet "Chucklehead" in your vocabulary.