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Phillip Allen
09-28-2009, 06:38 AM
there's a couple outside my window talking to one another...I love owls

Tristan
09-28-2009, 09:37 AM
Barred owls? They make wonderful sounds when there's a couple going back and forth.

Phillip Allen
09-28-2009, 09:39 AM
Great Horned Owls...

Tristan
09-28-2009, 09:46 AM
wonderfull deep hoots

Canoeyawl
09-28-2009, 09:48 AM
Keep your eye on your kittens...

Bruce Hooke
09-28-2009, 09:51 AM
Brings back memories of times in Western Massachusetts when I've been up early to get breakfast or bread started for a large group and walking to the kitchen before sunrise I've regularly heard barred owls.

Tristan
09-28-2009, 09:53 AM
Kittens? They'll take puppies too. We bought an airdale puppy from some folks who had to put a wire top over an outdoor pen because GHO's started swooping over the pen. In Texas I've seen GHO's catch full grown jack rabbets which are pretty big critters.

Canoez
09-28-2009, 09:53 AM
Who?

















;)

Tristan
09-28-2009, 10:00 AM
Who? No, "HOUGH!"

Phillip Allen
09-28-2009, 10:03 AM
Who? No, "HOUGH!"

ahh...

S/V Laura Ellen
09-28-2009, 10:38 AM
Many years ago my son came into the house and said there was something on the front porch, but wasn't sure what it was. Jo-Anne and I went out to the porch to investigate and found what looked like a pile of feeathers. On a closer examination we could tell it was a baby owl. After a few moments passed we heard a very upset owl calling from a close proximity. We thought it best to retun inside and let the mother owl straighten things out.

Kevin G
09-28-2009, 11:02 AM
A few winters ago, we had a Snowy Owl sitting on our roof for most of a day. Since I live near a wildlife sanctuary, there were many birders who came down to see it. One woman told me how lucky I was to have the owl on my house. I asked her if she were Italian, she answered "No." It is my understanding that Italians think it very bad luck to have owls on your roof. Anyone else hear that same?
KG

paladin
09-28-2009, 12:36 PM
Who gives a hoot? (not to you, Kevin)

Phillip Allen
09-28-2009, 12:44 PM
hey Chuck, have yhou ever camped under the whiporwills and had them make so much racket in the night that it hurt your ears? (ah, those were the days...)

ishmael
09-28-2009, 01:14 PM
I knew a woman, years back, who did a good enough imitation of a barred owl call to draw them in during the mating season. She taught me how, though I was never as good at it. Ah, Spring nights in the Ohio woods, confusing horny young barred owls! Does it get any better?

I hear them around here in the Spring, though I've never seen one. They must be pretty shy during the daylight.

Tom Montgomery
09-28-2009, 01:44 PM
The Shaker village at Pleasant Hill, Kentucky has miles of wooded hiking trails. One day as my ex-wife and I were hiking a large owl swooped out of a tree and flew not six feet above our heads and down the trail. Its flight was completely silent. But I could feel a faint breeze on the top of my head as he passed over us. Awesome.

Milo Christensen
09-28-2009, 02:01 PM
As a teenager, I often had to walk the 7 miles from our "farm" into Hancock. The Keeweenaw Peninsula of Michigan can get some incredible snow falls. So there I was one day, slogging through a foot and a half of powder which had fallen on a windless night when one of the now old fashioned wood posts used to hold the wires that kept cars out of the ditch took off and flew straight at me, just over my head. What I had taken for just another heap of snow on just another post was a Snowy Owl! I had heart palpitations for a bit, the Owl had, what seemed to me, a six foot wingspan and was completely silent.

Phillip Allen
09-28-2009, 02:13 PM
As a teenager, I often had to walk the 7 miles from our "farm" into Hancock. The Keeweenaw Peninsula of Michigan can get some incredible snow falls. So there I was one day, slogging through a foot and a half of powder which had fallen on a windless night when one of the now old fashioned wood posts used to hold the wires that kept cars out of the ditch took off and flew straight at me, just over my head. What I had taken for just another heap of snow on just another post was a Snowy Owl! I had heart palpitations for a bit, the Owl had, what seemed to me, a six foot wingspan and was completely silent.

I've had the great horned o's fly RIGHT past my face as I was getting out of the truck at night...not a sound except from me

Phillip Allen
09-28-2009, 02:20 PM
Before dawn one wet morning, I was on hands and knees in my front yard in Ohio, gathering giant nightcrawlers for a fishing trip. The only sounds were the wet and slimy rubbings of copulating worms, as I eased through the grass, snatching them up before they could escape into their tunnels.

Suddenly, I felt a rush of wind on the back of my neck, immediately followed by the searing pain of talons, digging through my sweatshirt and into my back. I was lifted slowly off the ground, and could only see the drumming wingtips of some great bird, fully ten feet off to either side.

The creature labored to get airborne under my weight, and started off towards the woods at the back of the property. He slowly gained altitude, and speed, but I could see one of the huge Willows in the back yard closing on us. The bird was unable to completely clear the tree, so he dropped me abruptly, sending me crashing into the tangle of Willow branches.

Thank God it wasn't the Honeylocust just a few yards to the side!

okay Donn...go stand in the corner till someone sends for you!

Tom Montgomery
09-28-2009, 02:30 PM
There is a bald eagle nest in the woodlot a quarter mile behind my brother's house in Vermilion Township, Ohio. You haven't lived until you've experienced a bald eagle fly close overhead! :eek:

Glen Longino
09-28-2009, 02:31 PM
There goes another thread!:D

Milo Christensen
09-28-2009, 02:41 PM
At least Donn's admitting he has a weight problem.

goodbasil
09-28-2009, 02:51 PM
Sunrise, years ago I brought a bus into UBC loop. Girl walking there with haystack hair. Owl sweeps down and makes a grab. She wasn't hurt but freaked right out. Wanted the cops to send out an execution squad.

Phillip Allen
09-28-2009, 03:15 PM
Sunrise, years ago I brought a bus into UBC loop. Girl walking there with haystack hair. Owl sweeps down and makes a grab. She wasn't hurt but freaked right out. Wanted the cops to send out an execution squad.

reckon she worked at the bunny club?

Tristan
09-28-2009, 03:25 PM
Before dawn one wet morning, I was on hands and knees in my front yard in Ohio, gathering giant nightcrawlers for a fishing trip. The only sounds were the wet and slimy rubbings of copulating worms, as I eased through the grass, snatching them up before they could escape into their tunnels.

Suddenly, I felt a rush of wind on the back of my neck, immediately followed by the searing pain of talons, digging through my sweatshirt and into my back. I was lifted slowly off the ground, and could only see the drumming wingtips of some great bird, fully ten feet off to either side.

The creature labored to get airborne under my weight, and started off towards the woods at the back of the property. He slowly gained altitude, and speed, but I could see one of the huge Willows in the back yard closing on us. The bird was unable to completely clear the tree, so he dropped me abruptly, sending me crashing into the tangle of Willow branches.

Dang Donn, the same thing happened to me but I hesitated to mention it, fearing no one would believe me.

paladin
09-28-2009, 07:53 PM
I have an owl nesting somewhere close by.....I see his/her "leftovers" in the yard periodically. Also a pair of Bald Eagles....unfortunately we also have idiot birdwatchers that drive into the cul-de-sac, block all traffic and walk off all around the houses, yards etc trying to find the eagles nest. The last time I came in and the entire drive was blocked, and was asked where are the eagles...I told them about 2 miles down the bay near the little park.....a few times like that and it gets quiet here. We also have a number of red tailed hawks that keep the swamp clear of mice....and an occasional groundhog......

Phillip Allen
09-28-2009, 07:59 PM
I'm gonna open all the windows tonight and listen to the music...need extra blankets though

Three Cedars
09-28-2009, 08:21 PM
We have barred owls in the area , the young ones are on their own now , I doubt the parents feed them but for whatever reason they are quite vocal . Visitors are amazed at the sounds they make , sort of a cross between a howler monkey and a banshee. The Great Horned owls have a deeper , plain hooting. Fearsome hunters they are.

Tom Montgomery
09-28-2009, 08:35 PM
I have an owl nesting somewhere close by.....I see his/her "leftovers" in the yard periodically. Also a pair of Bald Eagles....unfortunately we also have idiot birdwatchers that drive into the cul-de-sac, block all traffic and walk off all around the houses, yards etc trying to find the eagles nest. The last time I came in and the entire drive was blocked, and was asked where are the eagles...I told them about 2 miles down the bay near the little park.....a few times like that and it gets quiet here.

Yep. That's the problem my brother and his neighbor have. The State of Ohio publicized the location of the nest. Consequently everyone and his brother have shown up to see the eagles. It would be OK if they would simply park their cars on the side of the road and observe the bald eagles through binoculars. But most people want to walk right up to the nest, which is impossible without trespassing on private property. And, of course, no one bothers to ask permission. My brother and his neighbor get awfully tired of having to be the bad guys. But they take solace in the thought that they are helping to reduce stress for the eagles.

Shang
09-28-2009, 08:38 PM
Last year I heard a "mewing" sound from a cedar tree in the yard, I went with a flash light to see what it was.
A "branch-lings" of owls were out learning how to fly, hopping from branch to branch, testing their wings trying to learn how flying should be done. I was close enough to touch them, but didn't.
After a while they tired and went back to the nest. The next day I started building an owl-nesting-box to be hung on a nearby tree.

ishmael
09-28-2009, 09:04 PM
A friend worked at a wildlife rehab center. They kept a Great Horned Owl. Poor Ms. owl had been bashed by a car and had to have a wing amputated.

It was a good place. The animals were treated well. Ms. Owl had a large cage, set up for her disability, and was one of the main attractions at what amounted to a zoo with injured critters. Even missing a wing she was a magnificent animal. Big! Larger than a raven and smaller than an eagle.

What is it in our makeup? I imagine that owl was a real handful when someone found her, yet someone took the time and patience to rescue her. Was it a good thing? I can see an argument for letting the bird die, or putting it out of its misery. She's never going to be a wild owl again. And yet she was given a new, and fairly happy life. Humans are a compassionate lot, when we're not trying to kill each other.

Shang
09-28-2009, 09:09 PM
As Tom mentioned, there is an Eagle nesting place near our home on the lake, and too many people pull over to look at it. They don't know what they're seeing, nor do they have class-style binoculars, so they don't understand what they are seeing.

J. Dillon
09-28-2009, 09:39 PM
I took this image on Block Island RI a few years ago.

http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/1585/birdwatchers.jpg

Can you guess what they were looking at ?;):D

JD

Canoeyawl
09-28-2009, 11:35 PM
I thought Homeland security passed a law about folks with binoculars along the coastline...
I'm sure they did.
http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/1585/birdwatchers.jpg

purri
09-29-2009, 01:11 AM
Great horned owls? Try Powerful Owls (Ninox strenua). They snack on cats.

Phillip Allen
09-29-2009, 05:42 AM
I took this image on Block Island RI a few years ago.

http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/1585/birdwatchers.jpg

Can you guess what they were looking at ?;):D

JD

a wooden boat?

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-29-2009, 05:57 AM
Thanks to the British Army, we now have these chaps as a breeding species:

http://cache.eb.com/eb/image?id=65461&rendTypeId=4

The Eagle Owl.

Their arrival in Britain is hugely controversial amongst bird watchers, because nobody is quite sure whether they were once resident, and were killed out, or whether they have never been resident before.

A pair nested on an Army training range and since the British Army is composed almost entirely of bird watchers (in my experience, anyway - if you like being out of doors, which rather goes with being in the Army, you almost always like watching birds) they were left alone for thirty years until their descendants had gone beyond the training range often enough to be noticed...

They are happy to live entirely on rabbits, of which we have more than enough, so that's not a problem, but if we get another dose of myxy and a rabbit population crash things may become "interesting".

I think they are splendid.

We have a breeding pair of Little Owls near the house. They "don't belong here" either but have been around for a century or so, so not an issue.

Ironmule
09-29-2009, 05:40 PM
http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m236/dreadpendragon/tictac.jpg

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
09-30-2009, 01:36 AM
The Owl is the bringer of wisdom. The all-seeing owl possesses supernatural qualities and is often associated with intuition, clairvoyance and clairaudience. The Owl’s energy is at its peak in the very heart of darkness. When we are plunged into blindness and disorientation. He penetrates the darkness of the blackest night. Seeing and hearing that which others cannot.

A magical creature of the forest enigmatic and powerful.

If the owl is calling you, or you are aware of the owl being present in your life, dreaming or waking.

You are being called upon to open your eyes, ears and mind to the truth of a situation. To listen to the wisdom deep in your heart and soul. That still small voice is trying to reach you in some way. To assist you or help you in a current challenge you may be facing.

Tap into the power of the Owl by calling on your own intuition, listen to your own wisdom for there is something you need to see or hear. As the owl is so strongly associated with the night time, his wisdom may come to you while you slumber. So take the time to be aware of your dreams or make a special effort to remember and write down any important dreams you have. The Owl is a messenger that can bring clarity and illumination.

ishmael
09-30-2009, 01:57 AM
The owl is the totem of Athena in Greek mythology. Thus the bringer of wisdom.

dorydude
09-30-2009, 03:15 AM
Well, all I know about owls is that their heads fall off real easy:eek:.

Especially when hit by motorbikes!!

http://i36.tinypic.com/308i64g.jpg

http://i36.tinypic.com/2rm13er.jpg

Flying Orca
09-30-2009, 08:14 AM
All this naturalism and symbolism is fine, but maybe AC-B (and a very happy birthday to him, while I think of it) can tell me something I have long wondered: just exactly how boiled is an owl, and what does it have to do with ethanol consumption?

Andrew Craig-Bennett
09-30-2009, 08:44 AM
The answer will be found here:

http://freaky_freya.tripod.com/Drunktionary/A-B.html