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Tylerdurden
09-14-2009, 10:00 AM
- Tim O'Shea

Aldous Huxley's inspired 1954 essay detailed the vivid, mind-expanding, multisensory insights of his mescaline adventures. By altering his brain chemistry with natural psychotropics, Huxley tapped into a rich and fluid world of shimmering, indescribable beauty and power. With his neurosensory input thus triggered, Huxley was able to enter that parallel universe described by every mystic and space captain in recorded history. Whether by hallucination or epiphany, Huxley sought to remove all bonds, all controls, all filters, all cultural conditioning from his perceptions and to confront Nature or the World or Reality first-hand - in its unpasteurized, unedited, unretouched infinite rawness.
Those bonds are much harder to break today, half a century later. We are the most conditioned, programmed beings the world has ever known. Not only are our thoughts and attitudes continually being shaped and molded; our very awareness of the whole design seems like it is being subtly and inexorably erased. The doors of our perception are carefully and precisely regulated. Who cares, right?
It is an exhausting and endless task to keep explaining to people how most issues of conventional wisdom are scientifically implanted in the public consciousness by a thousand media clips per day. In an effort to save time, I would like to provide just a little background on the handling of information in this country. Once the basic principles are illustrated about how our current system of media control arose historically, the reader might be more apt to question any given story in today's news.
If everybody believes something, it's probably wrong. We call that
CONVENTIONAL WISDOM
In America, conventional wisdom that has mass acceptance is usually contrived: somebody paid for it. Examples:



Continued...http://www.thedoctorwithin.com/doors/Doors-of-Perception.php

Paul Pless
09-14-2009, 10:10 AM
Whether by hallucination or epiphany, Huxley sought to remove all bonds, all controls, all filters, all cultural conditioning from his perceptions and to confront Nature or the World or Reality first-hand - in its unpasteurized, unedited, unretouched infinite rawness.what a crock of ****

Tylerdurden
09-14-2009, 10:12 AM
what a crock of ****

I just knew you would like it.:D

ishmael
09-14-2009, 10:28 AM
No comment on hallucinogens per se. I will say that there are reasons for the filters. If you had everyone running around on mescaline things would fall apart. In some ways that could be good, but I like that my mail gets delivered on time, that the contractor I hire is here on time and does what is hired, that farmers and carpenters and physicists go to work and get things done.

That said, an occasional dip in the cosmic pool probably helped Huxley in his creative work. I don't think they should be illegal. Until quite recently they weren't illegal, but considered a part of the sacred; to be honored as part of the sacred on special occasions.

Cuyahoga Chuck
09-14-2009, 11:47 AM
You been a busy dude lately! Scott ever threaten to put limits on your aggregious use of WB's bandwidth?

Tylerdurden
09-14-2009, 11:52 AM
You been a busy dude lately! Scott ever threaten to put limits on your aggregious use of WB's bandwidth?


Learn to spell.;)

Michael s/v Sannyasin
09-14-2009, 12:50 PM
what a crock of ****

No, not really. That's precisely the basis of all meditation practices, removing mental filters by stopping thought.

Have you ever worn a pair of colored sunglasses? You put a pair of blue glasses on and everything looks blue. You know that everything really isn't blue, because you've seen it without the glasses on.

But, imagine if all of your life you've worn those blue sunglasses... you'd firmly believe that everything in the world was blue... imagine your surprise when you take the glasses off....
:cool:

peter radclyffe
09-14-2009, 02:44 PM
Paul did you never enjoy listening to the Doors, one of the best american bands

Tylerdurden
09-14-2009, 02:46 PM
Paul did you never enjoy listening to the Doors, one of the best american bands

Soft Parade.

Captain Blight
09-14-2009, 03:30 PM
One can remove the acculturation filters, train oneself to only see what's there, rigorously practice the scientific method as strictly as possible.....



....And still end up thinking differently to what you do, Tyler.

Haven't you drunk some Flav*R*Aid, too, Tyler? Aren't you an ideologue in your own right?

ishmael
09-14-2009, 04:00 PM
If you haven't read it, "Be Here Now," Ram Dass, aka Richard Alpert, is a pretty interesting read. He was one of the brightest of the brightest, a Harvard psychology prof. when he hooked up with Timothy Leary and took LSD. Back before it was illegal, I think. Anyway, he quit his job and wandered off to India looking for a guru. Sorta typical sixties madcap adventure. He finds a guy, a genuine siddha, and sits with him for a bit. At one point he gives the guy, with the fellow's permission, a large dose of LSD, thinking woo hoo, this is going to be great, my guru tripping his brains out! To his minor chagrin absolutely nothing changed. IIRC correctly, Alpert concluded the guy was already there, and a powerful hit of LSD was no more compelling than a cup of tea.

I want to be clear, I'm in no way advocating the use of hallucinogens. Used recreationally in the wrong set and setting, or by people who are psychologically unstable, they can be dangerous. My dear friend, Karen, killed herself, years after using them, I think in part because they opened a door to an incipient psychosis. Difficult to say just what the affect of the drugs was, but she could never quite close that door again, and it drove her to madness.

Captain Blight
09-14-2009, 08:51 PM
The thing about the hallucinogens I can't quite get over is that, yes, they can help you look at the world in a completely different way. They can enable you to look deeply into the infinity within. Anyone who has eaten like a quarter-ounce of mushroom caps can tell you that the effect can be one of deep, profound Truth resounding like the tolling of a great bell. There is no avoiding it and no hiding from it and no escaping it.

I also think that they're a spiritual shortcut. If you really want to open those doors, buckle down and do the meditative work. No pressure, no diamonds-- ya know?

Plus I have a couple of acquaintances who've broken their brains with too much street acid. Not a pleasant sight.

Rigadog
09-14-2009, 09:32 PM
Drugs like Mescaline, Peyote, LSD etc are used mostly recreationally in our culture. Their use is generally haphazard, offhand and aimed at short term escape. The trips we go on when we ingest these compounds are to no place in particular because we have mostly lost our sense of purpose and place. Other cultures historically have used these drugs to connect with different planes and gain knowledge. The American Indians used tobacco purposefully to help them see. In parts South America native peoples still use various potent drugs for the same reasons. Their use is considered a valid path to knowledge by their cultures. They don't view them is a shortcut. Perhaps we here feel that using them is cheating because we are so pickled in the Puritan work ethic. We feel. we have to work and struggle for wisdom and we may be wired that way. But for others it is different.

Michael s/v Sannyasin
09-15-2009, 09:30 AM
In The Psychedelic Experience, Timothy Leary explains how they were inducing the experience of the Bardo, as described in the Tibetan Book of the Dead, with LSD. Hardly recreational. Same thing, dissolution and re-integration, experienced by those who attain samadhi in meditation.

Chris Coose
09-15-2009, 10:24 AM
http://imagechan.com/images/71e741565193b5826963d210352646ba.jpg