PDA

View Full Version : DVD rehash



George Jung
08-30-2009, 09:27 PM
I heard/read (maybe in the Bilge) that there is a difference in 'life expectancy' for recorded DVD's, dependent on type of recording media used - that 'single use' recorded DVD's have a shortish half life (4-8 years) vs using the re-write DVD's . As I recall, the re-writeable DVD's use a different process?

Anyone recall this? Can you point me to an already existing thread?

BTW, looking at converting old VHS/ Digital 8 tapes to a newer, hopefully stable media. If I could burn to DVD's, that'd be simplest.
Thanks.

pcford
08-30-2009, 09:30 PM
I heard/read (maybe in the Bilge) that there is a difference in 'life expectancy' for recorded DVD's, dependent on type of recording media used - that 'single use' recorded DVD's have a shortish half life (4-8 years) vs using the re-write DVD's . As I recall, the re-writeable DVD's use a different process?

Anyone recall this? Can you point me to an already existing thread?

BTW, looking at converting old VHS/ Digital 8 tapes to a newer, hopefully stable media. If I could burn to DVD's, that'd be simplest.
Thanks.

As I understand it:

DVDs in whatever format, are not expected to be proper archival storage. The best archival storage is considered to be tape and hard drives. Digital 8 is actually a good format for fidelity...

George Jung
08-30-2009, 09:36 PM
I think you're correct - the problem being, I have family tapes (vhs) approaching 25 years of age - and last week, while attempting to show my inlaws a tape with their (now deceased) parents on it - it broke.

That, and our Dig. 8 camera went to that great Discount Store in the sky. If I could easily transfer to DVD, and have it 'last', that would be easiest. I'm really interested in easy!

If not, I'm probably looking at downloading to computer, savng to an external hard drive, plus DVD's for 'showing'.

That's not so easy. I know it'd work, but....

B_B
08-30-2009, 09:46 PM
If not, I'm probably looking at downloading to computer, savng to an external hard drive, plus DVD's for 'showing'.

That's not so easy. I know it'd work, but....
you don't mention how you'll get the VHS (etc.) data to disc?

there are places (high quality film processing places for example) where they'll transfer the images to digital file for you - that digital file can then be burned to disc, saved on hard drives, etc.

if the images are important to you I'drecom mend storing them in a medium other than disc..

Wayne Jeffers
08-30-2009, 09:46 PM
I think the essence of the problem is that DVD’s use a high degree of compression to fit a long movie on a single disk, therefore there is less redundancy to help overcome the effects of “bit rot,” i.e., the deterioration of the media over time.

For photos, CD’s are a longer-lived choice than DVD, but they’re not practical for storing movies.

With CD’s, I understand that the re-writeable disks actually hold up better over time than the write-once disks. The data is burned in metal in the re-writable, but the write-once uses some kind of organic dye that deteriorates much faster. Of course, the more expensive gold “archival” CD disks are far and away the best for long life.

IMO, external hard drive is your best bet for long life. Burn to DVD occasionally for a copy to play on the DVD player or to give as gifts, etc.

Wayne

pcford
08-30-2009, 11:25 PM
I think you're correct - the problem being, I have family tapes (vhs) approaching 25 years of age - and last week, while attempting to show my inlaws a tape with their (now deceased) parents on it - it broke.

That, and our Dig. 8 camera went to that great Discount Store in the sky. If I could easily transfer to DVD, and have it 'last', that would be easiest. I'm really interested in easy!

If not, I'm probably looking at downloading to computer, savng to an external hard drive, plus DVD's for 'showing'.

That's not so easy. I know it'd work, but....


Any decent post house can fix your busted VHS for you. They could also solve your footage problem...but post houses have horrific rates.

You can convert the VHS signal to digital by hooking the VHS VCR up to a DV camera which has "pass through" ability. After the VHS is digitized, this footage could be stored on a hard drive. (13 GB per hour) If you have a lot of footage, which would require multiple hard drives, it could be stored using a hard drive docking station. You plug a hard drive into a docking station and download the footage. Converting the stored footage to DVD is fairly simple with a program like Nero, for example.

I will repeat my suggestion that DVDs and Cds do not make great archival mediums. However, here is a discussion which provides some insight into how it can be done at the best level. This article is referenced by other Google sources. (Google is how I found it; I recommend the use of Google.)
http://theonlinephotographer.blogspot.com/2007/01/how-to-choose-cddvd-archival-media.html

Video is my "other" job; video is not really that hard to figure out...anyone who is bright enough to consider building a boat or doing serious work on a boat should be able to do it. Discussion about the percentage of readers here who are able to fulfill this criterion might be interesting but is not germane at the moment.

George Roberts
08-30-2009, 11:29 PM
George Jung ---

You can transfer the tapes to digital computer format using a standard TV input for a computer ($50 or less including software). In case you don't like the included software and since you don't have much, a trial version of TV capture is sufficient.

Use the highest quality recording mode. Convert to a format you want. Save to hard drive and burn DVDs.