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View Full Version : Should I wax my new Brightsides?



Oldersalt
08-26-2009, 02:41 PM
I put 4 coats of Interlux Brightsides on my new Redwing 18 hull and cabin sides about a month ago, so it should be completely cured by now. I did the roll/tip technique and it came out pretty good--for a beginner.

But, I haven't seen anything about the value of waxing a one-part urethane like Brightsides. With my previous fiberglass boats I always kept the gelcoat pretty well waxed, but I don't know if waxing this paint is worth the effort or not.

The boat will live on its trailer and be covered most of the time, but even so.....

Any thoughts and/or suggestions about this will be much appreciated.

Thorne
08-26-2009, 03:15 PM
Suspect it would make any touch-up nearly impossible...let's see what the experienced folks say.

For the next few years any painting you'll do will probably be repairing scrapes, dents, nicks, etc -- unless you leave it in the yard or live a perfect life...:D

Bob Cleek
08-26-2009, 04:10 PM
In a word, no. Just repaint it when the time comes. It's not meant to be waxed and doing so won't make any real difference, especially if the boat is stored indoors. Besides, the solvents commonly found in finishing waxes may damage the basic finish, being chemically incompatible, and the wax, if it remains on the surface will make refinishing impossible unless it is completely removed. Paint will essentially "bead up" on a waxed surface just the way water does. A patch of wax would ruin your whole topside paint job!

WoodenBNut
08-26-2009, 09:26 PM
No don't put any wax on your Brightsides paint. As said before in this forum--- it will make touchupsnearly impossible.
If you want more shine you can buff with 3M PerfectIt and/or 3M Imperial Compound (Imperial is more aggressive than PerfectIt). Personally, I buff with 3M PerfectIt once a season before the boat goes in the water in the spring. It puts a nice shine on the paint with no wax.

If you want to take out little imperfections in your roll/tip paint job (I always have a few imperfections), then wet sand with 350, 500, 1000,1500 (in that order). Then follow-up by buffing with a compound and finish with PerfectIt. But, don't do the whole paint job this way - just the small imperfections in the paint job. Be careful with the wet sanding and take it slow and easy.

pcford
08-26-2009, 09:50 PM
If you want to take out little imperfections in your roll/tip paint job (I always have a few imperfections), then wet sand with 350, 500, 1000,1500 (in that order). Then follow-up by buffing with a compound and finish with PerfectIt. But, don't do the whole paint job this way - just the small imperfections in the paint job. Be careful with the wet sanding and take it slow and easy.

Way too coarse for a sand/buff. I start about 800. 600 if there is some funky stuff.

I have never waxed paint, but I certainly do wax varnish...it's no big deal to recoat. The sanding takes the wax off.

pipefitter
08-27-2009, 01:46 AM
High gloss Brightside repels water for a few years without anything on it. It acts as if it has wax on it already. If you don't think so, try to keep it wet long enough ahead of the soap to wash it. You'll have to be quick about it. Also, it doesn't stain easily.

"BrightsideŽ contains TeflonŽ to resist staining and improve abrasion resistance"

I am surprised you got by with only 4 coats.

WoodenBNut
08-27-2009, 05:26 PM
Way too coarse for a sand/buff. I start about 800. 600 if there is some funky stuff.

I have never waxed paint, but I certainly do wax varnish...it's no big deal to recoat. The sanding takes the wax off.
Yes, I was too "heavy" on the coarse of the initial wet sanding. Probably 600 or 800 grit is a place to start for fixing the "flub ups", if you have any.