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ishmael
08-26-2009, 09:49 AM
That was as I was growing up a way of a mother to shoo her children. You remember, or maybe you don't. At one time the mother, and the hearth, was the heart of a house. There are lot's of complications in the model, not least of which momma wanting an intellectual life of her own. But there's something good to be said for flying kites.

Mrleft8
08-26-2009, 10:12 AM
I used to have kite building/flying parties on my birthday every year as a child....We never got to go fly the kites though, because it was always raining... (I can count on one hand the number of times it hasn't rained on my birthday in 48 years.) When I graduated to model rockets it was a little easier... Build the rockets the week before, get everyone over for the party, eat, rough house, send dad out in the rain to set up the launch pad, load the rockets with fuel..... RUN OUT INTO THE RAIN, stand under a tree while dad launches the rockets in the rain, go back inside for cake.

ahp
08-26-2009, 10:16 AM
In WWII the Germans used man lifting kites to lift an observer from the deck of a submarine. If they were surprised by an enemy airplane they had to cut the poor SOB loose and dive.

Peter Malcolm Jardine
08-26-2009, 10:29 AM
That was as I was growing up a way of a mother to shoo her children.


I doubt she ever said "Go get a case of Wild Turkey and live in a trailer"

LeeG
08-26-2009, 11:32 AM
That was as I was growing up a way of a mother to shoo her children. You remember, or maybe you don't. At one time the mother, and the hearth, was the heart of a house. There are lot's of complications in the model, not least of which momma wanting an intellectual life of her own. But there's something good to be said for flying kites.

A mother or your mother, I don't remember your mother. Our hearth was a gas wall heater. Did your mother ask many questions not caring for answers as a means to keep herself company? Some mothers asked questions and waited for answers, and there was time.

In the house I grew up "go fly a kite" was the equivalent of saying F*ck Off in a quiet voice.

Ted Hoppe
08-26-2009, 04:47 PM
So I was reading about this kite flying...then I began to imagineering.

Is there a narrow monohull designed kite sailer? It would be a logical derivative to the kite buggies akin to kite boarding. I would think a traction powered, shallow draft keelboat (or leaded centerboard) of 3.5 to 5 meters with foot steering and a raised 360 degree rotating pedestal seat would be a real hoot. It also would allow for company, storage and assisted power.

Ah that would deserve the phrase... Go fly a kite!

ishmael
08-26-2009, 05:01 PM
Just for fun I used to build a box kite out of balsa and tissue paper. The wind was always blowing on the edge of the plains, and I'd fly them on the thread of my mother's sewing basket, much to her chagrin.

Paul Pless
08-26-2009, 05:08 PM
Is there a narrow monohull designed kite sailer?they're called surfboards :p

Stiletto
08-26-2009, 05:27 PM
Kite fishing is gaining popularity here. A mate has just bought one and it has no sticks, just wind pockets.

http://fishingkites.co.nz/

Andrew Craig-Bennett
08-27-2009, 05:43 AM
Beijing is a great place for kite flying. You see elderly men with huge reels of nylon line, and then you look up and far, far away, high over the city, is a kite.

MiddleAgesMan
08-27-2009, 07:43 AM
While on vacation many years ago we came upon a section of coastal highway where several vendors were selling UFO kites. They had day-glo painted demo kites flying unattended to attract attention. They did appear to be UFOs spinning high above the dunes. We stopped and purchased one.

It was the most easily launched kite I've ever seen. One person holds the string and someone else stretches out a few yards of line, grasps the center disc, then tosses it into the air, imparting a back-spin just as you let go. It flew in the lightest of breezes with RPMs that increased with wind speed.

Ours was made of bare styrofoam sheets, about 1/4 inch thick. So it was pretty fragile. When it finally broke apart I tried to make another larger one but could never find material stiff and strong and light enough.

I found this site just now: http://www.cit.gu.edu.au/~anthony/kites/rotor/modern_ufo.html

My wing was slightly s-shaped, imparted by the shape of the slot through the vertical disc. According to the article a flat wing works as well or better.

This kite, with patent issued back in the 90s, is similar to what we bought at least 30 years ago:

http://www.google.com/patents?id=RKMcAAAAEBAJ&printsec=abstract&zoom=4&source=gbs_overview_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q=&f=false

rbgarr
08-27-2009, 09:04 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKGupz_9mGc

Captain Blight
08-27-2009, 09:23 AM
So I was reading about this kite flying...then I began to imagineering.

Is there a narrow monohull designed kite sailer? It would be a logical derivative to the kite buggies akin to kite boarding. I would think a traction powered, shallow draft keelboat (or leaded centerboard) of 3.5 to 5 meters with foot steering and a raised 360 degree rotating pedestal seat would be a real hoot. It also would allow for company, storage and assisted power.

Ah that would deserve the phrase... Go fly a kite!I'm workin on it, I'm workin on it! Just give a guy a minute, OK?

Actually, Peter Lynn Kites sells a little tiny inflatable catamaran. Looks fun... but wet.

From a strictly engineering standpoint, kites as motive force provide some distinct advantages to cloth hung on a stick. There's no mast, no shrouds (as we're used to thinking of them) no stays no halyards no topping lift; no outhaul, no downhaul, no boom vang. No chainplates, no mast step, no leaking partners. No need to engineer the hull to withstand stresses imposed by a mast and rig that simply isn't there.

Given that the kite is free to move from side to side, it would be a fairly simple matter to mount the attachment in a track that runs from beam to beam. The whole of the kite's pull could very well come from *just* above the leeward waterline. So, no heeling moment! So no ballast needed.

Absent the need for a heavy (or light but very expensive) structure to fly sails, and absent the need for the strength called for by a mast, absent the need for the beef needed to hang a heavy keel, the entire hull could be made lighter, much much lighter. Leaving more available for people or fermented malt beverages.


Kites are generally considered to be 2-5 times as efficient as the average sail, not only because of their shape (the best are quite efficient wings, like the Flysurf 19-sq-m. and its almost 8:1 aspect ratio) but because there is no mast or gaff or boom to interrupt airflow over the crucial leading third of the kite. And they can fly above the turbulent layer at the surface, well above it where the wind is steadier, smoother, and usually quite a bit stronger.


They aren't super-great at working to windward. 45 degrees into the wind is about as high as you can pinch it, and you're not really moving fast enough there to justify the effort. But at 50 degrees, my crappy old first-generation kite and homemade kiteboard can keep me planing and working upwind.

It's also tough to add area, though Prism's Stylus series all come with little loops sewn into the upper surface so you can lark's head kites together into a stack; in fact, the outright world sailing speed record for a while was held by Jacob's Ladder, a de-masted Tornado flying a stack of first-gen Flexifoils. It would be hard to do this on the move but I keep thinking about it. Also tough to reef but by sheeting in and out and adjusting where the kite is in the "wind window" you can moderate the pull to a very surprising degree; you can depower them to the point where there's almost no pull on the line.


Folds up into a backpack. Not any more expensive than sails from a decent manufacturer. Beautiful in their own right.

Shang
08-28-2009, 10:27 PM
Can kite flying cure impotency?
It depends on where you tie the string...