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David George
08-18-2009, 05:52 PM
Hi guys,

Does anyone know of any vendors that are making taffrail logs and spinners nowadays?

Just finished watching one of Lin and Larry Pardey's videos and noticed the one they had on Taliesin.

Thanks,

Dave G.

reddog
08-18-2009, 06:11 PM
Hi David;
I'm not aware of any currently being produced. The Walker Patent Log was one of the better know brands and you can still pick them up on E-Bay. I got one as a complete kit with oil, instructions and an extra spinner off E-Bay a few years ago. Prices are variable as can be the condition of the log.

Earl

PeterSibley
08-18-2009, 07:13 PM
$100 in my case .

reddog
08-19-2009, 04:43 AM
Peter, that's about what I paid for the one I got. I've seen them go for quite a bit more though.

Earl

Don Kurylko
08-19-2009, 11:14 AM
Walker Logs seem to come up on e-bay quite often. But be aware that there are two basic models. One is for motor vessels and registers more accurately at higher speeds up to around 12 knots. The other is for slower (sailing) vessels and registers more accurately at the lower end of the speed range, up to about 6 or 8 knots. I cannot remember which model is which, but a search on the net will turn up this information I'm sure.

redbopeep
08-19-2009, 11:50 AM
Walker Logs seem to come up on e-bay quite often. But be aware that there are two basic models. One is for motor vessels and registers more accurately at higher speeds up to around 12 knots. The other is for slower (sailing) vessels and registers more accurately at the lower end of the speed range, up to about 6 or 8 knots. I cannot remember which model is which, but a search on the net will turn up this information I'm sure.
There are actually several models and many of the ones you'll find are for ships not yachts.

On the yacht side--there are two, a little one that maxes out around 6-8 knots and a bigger one that is good at slightly higher speeds as you mention. The larger one is the Excelsior--that's what we've got. http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?p=2124730

Don Kurylko
08-19-2009, 12:57 PM
I believe the smaller one is preferred for offshore passages on sailboats because of the significant amount of time spent under sail in conditions where maximum hull speed is not often attained. The mileage recorded will be more accurate for navigation purposes than if the larger model is used. (There might be more about this in one of the old Hiscock books on passage making.)

However, all this is academic. A cheap GPS will do the same thing, more accurately, and without the need to drag shark baiting rotors through the water. :eek:

Iknow, I know…carry spare batteries! :D

andrewe
08-19-2009, 02:09 PM
Bin there, on a very slow Med crossing something bit off the rotor. Noticed it the next morning by the slack trail. Interesting, the recorded distance was exactly the straight line distance between the two ports over about 200 NM. GPS may not have agreed...
A

redbopeep
08-19-2009, 02:46 PM
I believe the smaller one is preferred for offshore passages on sailboats because of the significant amount of time spent under sail in conditions where maximum hull speed is not often attained. The mileage recorded will be more accurate for navigation purposes than if the larger model is used. (There might be more about this in one of the old Hiscock books on passage making.)

However, all this is academic. A cheap GPS will do the same thing, more accurately, and without the need to drag shark baiting rotors through the water. :eek:

Iknow, I know…carry spare batteries! :D

It really is dependent upon the size of the boat. Ours has a 47 ft waterline and the larger one is more appropriate. The folks who used it for many years before giving it to us had a boat with 35 ft waterline and used it quite successfully for many trips.

potterer
08-22-2009, 02:15 PM
However, all this is academic. A cheap GPS will do the same thing, more accurately, and without the need to drag shark baiting rotors through the water. :eek:


Not really: the GPS measures speed over the ground, while the log measures speed through the water. The tide can make a lot of difference.

Ian McColgin
08-22-2009, 02:55 PM
It was the summer of ‘67 when I was hired to commission a ketch and then sail with the owner and his chums off into the broad Atlantic. He had a nice patent log that had been on display at his office for years. The spinners’ flat black finish had been removed and the lovely bronze kept shined. So, all three were lost before we cleared Montauk.

For those who don’t want something that can break and won’t become green ginge and who update the log at least every hour or on any course or speed change, an older edition of WB has a nice article on how to make a --- damn I’m having an off-shore moment and forgetting the name but basically it’s just a little nubbin on the bottom with a forward facing hole so it raises a water column the faster you go. It has a clever step-down reservoir, air dampening and some other easily made refinements but it’s dirt simple. I’ll be finding that article this winter to make one. The very thing.

Captain Intrepid
08-22-2009, 03:23 PM
It was the summer of ‘67 when I was hired to commission a ketch and then sail with the owner and his chums off into the broad Atlantic. He had a nice patent log that had been on display at his office for years. The spinners’ flat black finish had been removed and the lovely bronze kept shined. So, all three were lost before we cleared Montauk.

For those who don’t want something that can break and won’t become green ginge and who update the log at least every hour or on any course or speed change, an older edition of WB has a nice article on how to make a --- damn I’m having an off-shore moment and forgetting the name but basically it’s just a little nubbin on the bottom with a forward facing hole so it raises a water column the faster you go. It has a clever step-down reservoir, air dampening and some other easily made refinements but it’s dirt simple. I’ll be finding that article this winter to make one. The very thing.

Tis a Pitot tube. Most people will have seen them on aircraft for measuring airspeed.

Don Z.
08-22-2009, 03:45 PM
manometer... like a pitot tube. Number 111.

paladin
08-22-2009, 05:49 PM
chip log is simpler....use your broken pencils.....

Ian McColgin
08-22-2009, 06:05 PM
Thank you Don Z. Manometer. Cool giz.