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fergie
12-31-2002, 01:50 PM
I had just hung the second broadstrake on the Haven I’m building, and came back the next day and noticed that at the transom the plank had pulled up a little. Wonder what was up (so to speak) and after further inspection, I found that the plank had actually split in the middle along an internal sap pocket or defect of some kind. Plank looked great on the outside, but may have had some telltale signs I should have noticed on the inside (very very slight darker line visible down short middle section after careful inspection). When I cut off part of the overhang and inspected inside, it was alot more obvious. I need a better set of eyes or a plank x-ray machine. Anyway, appears the problem area stops about a foot and a half forward of the transom. My question is this, 1) should I unfasten the plank and replace it, and if so, will this weaken the frames any by putting in more screw holes, 2) should I cut the offending bad part of the plank and try to butt block or splice a new tail section on, or other ideas. You live and learn, but this project is two steps forward and two steps back!

Dave Fleming
12-31-2002, 02:03 PM
Now, I don't really wish to sound too pendantic here but, folks you have to look carefully at your planking stock, piece bye piece.
Each plank space on your boat/s will need an almost different type of stock, vertical grain, flat grain etc..
Seeing as I cannot read minds nor see all the way from San Diego to No Carolina, I am guessing here.

Sounds like you chose a piece of stock with a wind shake in it or attached it with the 'cup' upwards and that was enough strain to cause the wood to split along growth ring lines.

IMOOP, I would most definitely pull off the plank place it aside and hope you can salvage parts of it for something else.
In new build work, yards bought a lot of wood, all flitch sawn, one person was responsible for 'cruising the wood pile' for stock needed at a particular place on the hull ( both sides!). There was lots of wood shifted bye us apprentices in those times. :rolleyes:
Was a lesson all in itself, if ya folla?

[ 12-31-2002, 02:04 PM: Message edited by: Dave Fleming ]

TomHaven12
12-31-2002, 03:05 PM
Fergie...

You've said before that each step seems to get a little more difficult. Is the planking the hardest step so far? Harder than the keel?

fergie
12-31-2002, 03:59 PM
TomHaven,

After getting four on (minus one for a redo now), I feel like I'm getting into the flow better. Don't let anyone kid you though, planking aint easy for the novice, and yes, I'd say it is the most difficult thus far. I don't have the luxury of first hand experience that Dave describes above, and am just learning as I go. I am trying to do good work and have probably spent more time than needed fitting each plank. These little "learning experiences" as described above really take the wind out of your sails, not to mention slow momentum, but I am as yet undeterred!

Dave Fleming
12-31-2002, 04:07 PM
I don't have the luxury of first hand experience that Dave describes above, and am just learning as I go. I am trying to do good work and have probably spent more time than needed fitting each plank. These little "learning experiences" as described above really take the wind out of your sails, not to mention slow momentum, but I am as yet undeterred! Fergie, that is why this is called Building and Repair. Don't be hesitant to come and ask for advice before beginning a new project. That is what this is truly about...helping out, sharing, commiserating, ya folla?

fergie
12-31-2002, 04:17 PM
Dave, I really appreciate all the help that you and all others offer in this forum! This forum, the Haven forum, and a handful of books have landed me in alot less trouble than I'd be without them.

As far as replacing the plank, at least I have a great pattern to work with. Should I be concerned about screw locations?

Dave Fleming
12-31-2002, 04:33 PM
There ye go Laddy Buck look on the bright side or cry, take your pick. ;)

Yes I would plug the screw holes with some soft wood, ya still ain't tole me what planking wood ya usin'?

We would make screw hole plugs bye the wheelbarrow full using a block of Alaska Cedar or Port Orford Cedar. Using just the bandsaw to shape, relieve the waste and cut from the block.
But do it anyway you are comfortable and you don't have to use epoxee for a glue. Good old Weldwood Plastic Resin works just fine. Let sit and cure for at least a day and then come back and slick off the proud ends, rebore for next larger screw size and yer on yer way. ;)

Rosebud
12-31-2002, 05:39 PM
You just had a "Learning Experience"! Take the plank off and replace it. It won't take that long and you'll be much happier later. Plug the screw holes with tapered plugs in epoxy and redrill for the new screws as usual. All the advice about inspecting the grain of the wood is excellent. Also, be careful when hollowing out the inside of the plank to fit around the transom curves. Don't know the Haven planking that well, but the planking should be carefully hollowed (or crowned) to fit the frames and transom or it might crack down the middle from the stress of the fastenings.

Best of luck,
Jim and Kim