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Captain Blight
08-15-2009, 09:02 PM
Unless and until everyone's read this (http://healthcarereformmyths.org/HealthcareReformMyths.php).

Please.

It'll make for informed discourse, instead of ugly polemic. Anyway, it can't hurt; and it might help.

Keith Wilson
08-15-2009, 09:09 PM
There was an excellent article on health care reform in The New Republic a couple of months ago. You can read it here. (http://www.tnr.com/politics/story.html?id=4d41ab07-8c25-4b22-81d2-02b4d149afe2)

Jim Bow
08-15-2009, 09:12 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mw6H3crLzpg

Phil Heffernan
08-15-2009, 09:32 PM
Here's MY favorite analysis:

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200909/health-care

"But health insurance is different from every other type of insurance. Health insurance is the primary payment mechanism not just for expenses that are unexpected and large, but for nearly all health-care expenses. We’ve become so used to health insurance that we don’t realize how absurd that is. We can’t imagine paying for gas with our auto-insurance policy, or for our electric bills with our homeowners insurance, but we all assume that our regular checkups and dental cleanings will be covered at least partially by insurance. Most pregnancies are planned, and deliveries are predictable many months in advance, yet they’re financed the same way we finance fixing a car after a wreck—through an insurance claim.....

...Insurance is probably the most complex, costly, and distortional method of financing any activity; that’s why it is otherwise used to fund only rare, unexpected, and large costs. Imagine sending your weekly grocery bill to an insurance clerk for review, and having the grocer reimbursed by the insurer to whom you’ve paid your share. An expensive and wasteful absurdity, no?"

Worth the read!
PH

PeterSibley
08-15-2009, 10:20 PM
Or read about the Australian version ...quite popular over this way .

The public health system is called Medicare (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicare_%28Australia%29). It ensures free universal access (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_access) to hospital treatment and subsidised out-of-hospital medical treatment. It is funded by a 1.5% tax levy on all taxpayers, an extra 1% levy on high income earners, as well as general revenue

George Roberts
08-16-2009, 12:34 AM
Unless and until everyone's read this (http://healthcarereformmyths.org/HealthcareReformMyths.php).

Please.

It'll make for informed discourse, instead of ugly polemic. Anyway, it can't hurt; and it might help.

"If passed 114m will leave private health insurance"

Informed discourse implies that the participants are going to be honest. The source quoted creates straw men and casts them as myths. Hardly honest.

In any case, health care reform is dead until the next election. It is a shame. I saw at least a dozen possible avenues for approving health care appear in various publications. They all had simplicity at their core.

Mr. Obama blew it. He left it up to Congress to write a plan.

Dan McCosh
08-16-2009, 09:01 AM
Here's MY favorite analysis:

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200909/health-care

"But health insurance is different from every other type of insurance. Health insurance is the primary payment mechanism not just for expenses that are unexpected and large, but for nearly all health-care expenses. We’ve become so used to health insurance that we don’t realize how absurd that is. We can’t imagine paying for gas with our auto-insurance policy, or for our electric bills with our homeowners insurance, but we all assume that our regular checkups and dental cleanings will be covered at least partially by insurance. Most pregnancies are planned, and deliveries are predictable many months in advance, yet they’re financed the same way we finance fixing a car after a wreck—through an insurance claim.....

...Insurance is probably the most complex, costly, and distortional method of financing any activity; that’s why it is otherwise used to fund only rare, unexpected, and large costs. Imagine sending your weekly grocery bill to an insurance clerk for review, and having the grocer reimbursed by the insurer to whom you’ve paid your share. An expensive and wasteful absurdity, no?"

Worth the read!
PH

I've often thought that it would be helpful to stop calling health insurance "insurance". In reality it is a collective, communal way of sharing health-care costs, that amounts to everyone participating putting their annual medical bills into the pot, then splitting up the total and each paying their share at the end of the year. In such a system, decisions will have to be made about who gets what, and who pays what. The arguments are really about how and by whom these decisions are to be made.
It really has no comparison to risk insurance, liability, etc., which are more of a bet between the insurer and the beneficiary whether something is going to happen or not--which is what "insurance" usually implies.