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View Full Version : Perseids set for sky show



Peerie Maa
08-11-2009, 03:18 PM
It's 10/10th cloud cover here. Anybody got clear skies with a chance to see these?
Perseids (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3136497.stm)

Clencher
08-11-2009, 03:35 PM
Would you believe it! It's been crystal clear blue sky here in S. Wales all day - until sundown, it's now 10/10 like with you Nick. First sunny day of the summer but now back to rain by the looks.

Peerie Maa
08-11-2009, 03:55 PM
I blame Lefty. He's been moaning about rain for weeks, must have found a way to send it east.:(

Glen Longino
08-11-2009, 04:17 PM
Would you believe it! It's been crystal clear blue sky here in S. Wales all day - until sundown, it's now 10/10 like with you Nick. First sunny day of the summer but now back to rain by the looks.

Same here, sunny and 100 degrees for weeks, but this afternoon it has clouded up.

htom
08-11-2009, 05:01 PM
Looking out the window, I see the DayStar, but he's surrounded by cloudiness. :(

John of Phoenix
08-11-2009, 07:04 PM
First cloud cover in weeks here. :(



http://www.latimes.com/media/photo/2008-08/41514400.jpg
The annual Perseid meteor showers (http://travel.latimes.com/daily-deal-blog/index.php/plan-for-perseid-met-4966/), which seem to radiate from the constellation Perseus, have been viewable to some extent since around July 17. But tonight, they are expected to be at their peak, with as many as 80 (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/08/090810-perseid-meteor-shower.html) meteors streaking the sky hourly.
You can look up for them throughout the night tonight, but especially promising times are between 9 and 11 p.m. PDT, and before dawn on Wednesday morning, according to a NASA blog (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/10aug_horseflies.htm?list1336773) (by the way, this NASA post provides a fun 101 on meteors).
Just before the first rays of Wednesday, you may see “dozens” of the shooting stars. The 9-to-11 p.m. window, though, is when you should watch for what astronomers call “earthgrazers,” which may make up for their lack of frequency with their memorable good looks. These are “meteors that approach from the horizon and skim the atmosphere overhead like a stone skipping across the surface of a pond,” said Bill Cooke of NASA, as quoted in another NASA post (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/31jul_perseids2009.htm). “They are long, slow and colorful — among the most beautiful of meteors.”

Shang
08-11-2009, 08:42 PM
Overcast here, and we are back in town with a sky-glow so we'll probably miss the best.
I remember one night not so long ago when my kid and I were saw so many and so bright that we cast our shadows...

Now he has kids of his own to watch these wonders.