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paladin
07-31-2009, 03:47 AM
In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame,

two is a law firm and three or more is a congress.-- John Adams

Phillip Allen
07-31-2009, 06:07 AM
laughing... :)

bluedog225
07-31-2009, 06:51 AM
Not funny.

Lawyers, who needs em? Unless you care about a nation of laws and the administration of the justice system. When someone steals your boat or hits you on the head with a pipe to get the cash in your pocket, I bet you want them tried, convicted, and put away, right? Lawyers take care of that.

Looking at other countries where the rule of law is less respected and people more frequently settle disputes without the judicial system is not a system I'd be comfortable with.

Our society runs on a complex system of rules and it runs pretty well. Try to run the system without the people who are trained to administer that system and you end up in the same place as the boatbuilder who builds a giant steel ship without a naval architect.

Lawyer bashing shouldn't be encouraged. It's divisive and teaches everyone (including the next generation) not to respect the law. And whether you like it or not, the law is our agreement with each other.

I'm certain I would rather be responding to someone less helpful, civil, and senior on this forum but I've made a commitment to myself not to sit by quietly while people make these kind of comments. Pardon the sarcastic tone. Nothing personal. :)

Tom

Phillip Allen
07-31-2009, 06:57 AM
Yep...lawyers are VERY useful. What if you spill a cup of hot coffee in your lap...who will you get to help you get "proper" compensation?

What if your seven year old daughter wants you to have words stamped into our coinage changed?

There are many things lawyers are good for!

Paul Pless
07-31-2009, 07:02 AM
Not funny.au contraire
Lawyer bashing shouldn't be encouraged. you're being serious, aren't you?:rolleyes:

stevebaby
07-31-2009, 07:05 AM
Not funny.

Lawyers, who needs em? Unless you care about a nation of laws and the administration of the justice system. When someone steals your boat or hits you on the head with a pipe to get the cash in your pocket, I bet you want them tried, convicted, and put away, right? Lawyers take care of that.

Looking at other countries where the rule of law is less respected and people more frequently settle disputes without the judicial system is not a system I'd be comfortable with.

Our society runs on a complex system of rules and it runs pretty well. Try to run the system without the people who are trained to administer that system and you end up in the same place as the boatbuilder who builds a giant steel ship without a naval architect.

Lawyer bashing shouldn't be encouraged. It's divisive and teaches everyone (including the next generation) not to respect the law. And whether you like it or not, the law is our agreement with each other.

I'm certain I would rather be responding to someone less helpful, civil, and senior on this forum but I've made a commitment to myself not to sit by quietly while people make these kind of comments. Pardon the sarcastic tone. Nothing personal. :)

TomThank you Tom.
People are quick to forget that the only reason they have any rights at all are because lawyers fought for those rights in the courts.

Phillip Allen
07-31-2009, 07:06 AM
come to think of it...our presidents are generally lawyers...aren't they?

Paul Pless
07-31-2009, 07:07 AM
People are quick to forget that the only reason they have any rights at all are because lawyers fought for those rights in the courts.surely we could turn this into a gun thread :D

Phillip Allen
07-31-2009, 07:08 AM
only if someone shoots off his mouth :)

Popeye
07-31-2009, 07:12 AM
lawyer jokes eh ..

a lawyer falls off his boat and starts treading water , hungry sharks come over and start circling the lawyer .. and then finally just swim away

.. professional courtesy

bluedog225
07-31-2009, 07:15 AM
Yep...lawyers are VERY useful. What if you spill a cup of hot coffee in your lap...who will you get to help you get "proper" compensation?

What if your seven year old daughter wants you to have words stamped into our coinage changed?

There are many things lawyers are good for!

McDonalds if a fun case if you don't let the facts bother you.

185 degree coffee and full thickness burns to the crotch. Lot's of other, less publicized injuries.

See: http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm

Gotta go to work now. Public servant and the public needs help.

Paul Pless
07-31-2009, 07:17 AM
Well said, Tom. People somehow think it's funny to typecast lawyers, but when they need one, they aren't disparaging the one that represents them.

If you had said something like 'all white cops are racists', you'd be torn to pieces here... but somehow it seems perfectly OK to take the same attitude with lawyers.

I think I have a pretty good sense of humor... but I never find jokes made at someone else's expense to be funny.What a crock of ****... I regularly employ two law firms, one lawyer in particular, bills me about 75 to 100 hours annually since 1992. Most every lawyer I've personally worked with appreciates the self depricating humour of lawyer jokes. I mean comeon Norman, you can't be serious!

Popeye
07-31-2009, 07:23 AM
the self depricating humour of lawyer jokes.

bil is a lawyer , he tells this one ..


what's the difference between a lawyer and a bucket of sh1t ..

.. the bucket

brad9798
07-31-2009, 07:29 AM
What a crock of ****... I regularly employ two law firms, one lawyer in particular, bills me about 75 to 100 hours annually since 1992. Most every lawyer I've personally worked with appreciates the self depricating humour of lawyer jokes. I mean comeon Norman, you can't be serious!

Well said, Paul.

Anybody care to guess what I pay monthly? I've paid for the right to make all the jokes I wish!
__________________________

Since about 99% of jokes are someone's expense, you evidently do not have a good sense of humor ... or at least you might have a hypocritical sense of humor! :D
____________________

What's the difference between a dead lawyer and a dead car salesman on the road? There are skid marks in front of the salesman!
________________________________

Before you whiny folks get all upset, of COURSE there is a HUGE need for lawyers ... and there are some great lawyers in all parts of our country!

A few TV-ad and high profile lawyers make it rough for good, legit attorneys!

brad9798
07-31-2009, 07:40 AM
That's why I don't where cheap sweatpants to McDonalds ...

Serious merit?

Maybe a 79 year old woman ought not be f-ing around with hot coffee in the car!

The same thing would have happened in her kitchen ... who would she have sued in that case? The countertop?
___________________________________

That being said? I AGREE with her sueing on the fact that she wanted a simple settlement to cover her expenses. I believe that to be fair! McD's was stupid not to take her up on it.

Seven years ago, my wife was injured by a negligent construction company in Florida ... Palm Island, FL to be exact.

Long story short- torn her MCL in half ... ripped the ACL, etc., etc. Full blown Frankenstein staples re-constructive surgery!

My out of pocket was about $3 grand ... I told their insurance company that's all I wanted ... they told me to go to hell. Five months later, they wrote me a check for six-figures GROSS. Net was five-figures ... I lost sleep over it ... I did not want the money, but I was so mad at the STUPID ins. company, I had no other (at least in my mind) choice.

We donated a nice chunk and put the rest in the kids funds!

Paul Pless
07-31-2009, 07:57 AM
Are you aware that McDonalds settled a number of cases of burn injury out of court?So?settling a case out of court is an implied admission of wrong doing? Or, is it more likely an acceptable business decision in our litigious society??

Old Sailor
07-31-2009, 08:34 AM
Guy goes into a bar and yells "All lawyers are assholes"
There is quiet in the bar.
Then a guy at the end of the bar yells "I resent that"
First guy says " Why, you a lawyer?"
"Nope, I'm an asshole.
Old Sailor

Paul Pless
07-31-2009, 08:40 AM
Yet conservatives still hold this case up as some sort of example of litigation gone to excessive lengths... irrespective of the facts of the case.$3 Million Dollars for a six square inch burn... I should be so lucky.:rolleyes:

Paul Pless
07-31-2009, 08:46 AM
She didn't get $3Mthe facts...
The jury awarded Liebeck $200,000 in compensatory damages. This amount
was reduced to $160,000 because the jury found Liebeck 20 percent at
fault in the spill. The jury also awarded Liebeck $2.7 million in
punitive damages. . .sorry... $2.86 Million

contented
07-31-2009, 08:46 AM
I hope someone knows the punchline to "how lawyers are conceived" so I don't have to say it.

Vince Brennan
07-31-2009, 08:59 AM
the facts...sorry... $2.86 Million

Nope. (http://en.allexperts.com/e/l/li/liebeck_v._mcdonald%27s_corp..htm)


Extract:


Settlement

*Applying the principles of comparative negligence (http://en.allexperts.com/e/c/co/comparative_negligence.htm), the jury (http://en.allexperts.com/e/j/ju/jury.htm) found that McDonald's was 80% responsible for the incident and Liebeck was 20% at fault. Though there was a warning on the coffee cup, the jury decided that the warning was neither large enough nor sufficient. They awarded Liebeck US$200,000 in compensatory damages (http://en.allexperts.com/e/c/co/compensatory_damages.htm), which was then reduced by 20% to US$160,000. In addition, they awarded her US$2.7 million in punitive damages (http://en.allexperts.com/e/p/pu/punitive_damages.htm).
**However, the judge reduced punitive damages to US$480,000; thus Liebeck was awarded US$640,000 in total. Both McDonald's and Liebeck appeal (http://en.allexperts.com/e/a/ap/appeal.htm)ed, and in December 1994, the two came to a confidential (http://en.allexperts.com/e/c/co/confidential.htm) settlement (http://en.allexperts.com/e/s/se/settlement_%28law%29.htm), the amount of which is secret, but is believed to be approximately equal to the amount of the final judgment.

stevebaby
07-31-2009, 09:10 AM
lawyer jokes eh ..

a lawyer falls off his boat and starts treading water , hungry sharks come over and start circling the lawyer .. and then finally just swim away

.. professional courtesyA lawyer attends a legal convention and while doing a bit of networking, bumps into Satan.
Over a convivial beverage or several, Satan offered the lawyer a deal.
"I'll bring you the richest clients," said the fork-tailed one," I'll guarantee a favourable result and fees beyond your wildest dreams. All I ask is the eternal souls of your children.".
"Oh yeah," says the lawyer,"What's the catch?".

And that joke was told to me by the partner of the firm which was representing me in a civil case, and he proceeded to give me professional advice as to how I could best protect my assets and income in the event of an adverse outcome in the suit I was bringing.
It didn't occur to me until some years later, when I studied law myself, that the advice he gave me was intended to protect me from the firm in which he was a senior partner, and was very much against his own financial interests.
He was an honest and ethical lawyer, as are most of the lawyers I ever met. And I've met more than most people have, about which I will say no more, because my beer is getting warm, and my favourite band is playing on a DVD.

Mrleft8
07-31-2009, 09:17 AM
They make great bait.

John Smith
07-31-2009, 09:22 AM
Yep...lawyers are VERY useful. What if you spill a cup of hot coffee in your lap...who will you get to help you get "proper" compensation?

What if your seven year old daughter wants you to have words stamped into our coinage changed?

There are many things lawyers are good for!

My aunt was knocked over by an employee in her local Walmart. Broke her wrist. Walmart was extremely non cooperative UNTIL she got a lawyer.

As to the McDonald's coffee thing, knowing more of the facts can change your mind. Our government offers guidelines for coffee tempterature. McDonald's had been selling coffee consistantly above that temperature, and had 100s of complaints about burned lips, tongues and such. All of these were presented to the jury.

Yes, the lady didn't to the smartest thing in the world, but if the coffee had been within the guidelines, she wouldn't have suffered from the burns she suffered from.

Why do they serve their coffee so hot? If you're in their restaurant eating, you finish your food, and coffee is still hot. This brings many people back to the counter for additional food.

It's almost like putting stuff into cigarettes for the sole purpose of making them more addictive.

Ever tried to deal with car insurance without an attorney?

Paul Pless
07-31-2009, 09:24 AM
Wrong:thank you for the correction :)

stevebaby
07-31-2009, 09:37 AM
So?settling a case out of court is an implied admission of wrong doing? Or, is it more likely an acceptable business decision in our litigious society??It can be either or both. Either way, it is only of concern to the parties to the litigation. There is always the choice to refuse the offered settlement and continue the litigation in public. I've settled when bringing an action, and did so because it saved me the stress and uncertainty of a verdict which may have been overturned on appeal, although the eventual outcome was fairly safe. (Or I would never have brought the actions).
I've known some very skilled and very highly paid lawyers who give their time on cases that they know they will not get paid for, and cases that they know they probably won't win or get paid for, just to make a legal point.
Particularly as citizens of the USA, I think you should be eternally grateful for all those lawyers whom you disparaged who have fought for your rights and clarified them before the Supreme Court of the USA.
And hang burning tyres(note correct spelling) around the necks of the bad ones too.

George Jung
07-31-2009, 09:42 AM
:D:D

Great thread - I haven't seen so many twisted, frilly, pink undies in a long time! (This is the chum thread, right?)

Our medical center has decided to use lawyers, instead of rats, for their experiments.

There's more of 'em.

You don't get as attached to them.

And there's somethings even rats won't do! :p

So there!

rbgarr
07-31-2009, 09:52 AM
Well said, Tom. People somehow think it's funny to typecast lawyers, but when they need one, they aren't disparaging the one that represents them.

If you had said something like 'all white cops are racists', you'd be torn to pieces here... but somehow it seems perfectly OK to take the same attitude with lawyers.

I think I have a pretty good sense of humor... but I never find jokes made at someone else's expense to be funny.

All lawyers are racists? That's not funny, Norm. ;)

Pugwash
07-31-2009, 09:53 AM
Ah, the good old McDonalds coffee trial.

Interesting how people react to it. Even more intersting, is how some people embrace the myth without question. Probably because it feeds their pedjudices not only about lawyers but about how there are so many frivolous law suits.

Paul might want to note this.


She was hospitalized for eight days, during which time she
underwent skin grafting. Liebeck, who also underwent debridement
treatments, sought to settle her claim for $20,000, but McDonalds refused.

Robmill0605
07-31-2009, 09:54 AM
Lawyers are just someone who strips two people for a prize fight, and then steals their clothes.:D

Paul Pless
07-31-2009, 09:59 AM
but I never find jokes made at someone else's expense to be funny.what if the joke makes engineers look really witty??

Engineers and Lawyers


There was once an engineer who found a magic lamp. When he rubbed it, a genie jumped out and said to him, "You have three wishes. But there is a catch - this wish system of mine was designed by a lawyer, so whatever you wish for every lawyer in the world will get double of!"
The engineer replied, "That's no problem, I can live with that." He then said, "For my first wish, I wish I had a Ferarri."
"OK", said the genie, and a Ferarri appeared in front of the engineer. "But remember, every lawyer in the world now has 2 Ferarris," the genie told the engineer.
The engineer remained unperturbed and said, "For my second wish, I wish for a million bucks." So a million bucks appeared in front of the engineer and the genie said, "remember, every lawyer in the world now has 2 million bucks."
The engineer was non-committal and then said, "I always wished I could donate a kidney!"

Robmill0605
07-31-2009, 10:10 AM
Here's an ethical question for lawyers. An old ladies husband dies. She goes to pay her lawyers for probate.
" how much do I owe you?" the old lady says.
" a thousand dollars" the legal beagle explains.
The old lady writes him a check for two thousand dollars.....

The ethical question for attorneys;

Does the lawyer tell his partner about the extra grand?

Paul Pless
07-31-2009, 10:12 AM
Maybe because I know what it's like to be on the butt end of jokes like that.You're really that sensitive to a bit of humor? Why? Unable to laugh at yourself? Seriously.

bobbys
07-31-2009, 10:15 AM
Now that Congress is Democratic in the majority i find this joke highly humorous but in 2010 will fail to see the humor when the Congress is swept away of evildoers and scalawags and despicable traitors and pretty much Bad men and replaced by men of Honor and upstanding integrity..

This is a joke for all the humor challenged people here:D

Robmill0605
07-31-2009, 10:15 AM
You're really that sensitive to a bit of humor? Why? Unable to laugh at yourself? Seriously.


When are you going to realize that liberals have no sense of humor?
They are too busy worrying about how unfair, mean and unjust America is.

Kaa
07-31-2009, 10:18 AM
Sorry. I really do have a good sense of humor... but once again, jokes made at the expense of other people, or which typecast whole classes of people, just aren't funny to me.

So, you find most of the jokes not funny but still think you really do have a good sense of humor..? :D

Kaa

Phillip Allen
07-31-2009, 10:23 AM
I have no problem laughing at myself... and I'm often the target of jokes by my wife and daughters... but the difference is that I know they love me, and aren't disparaging me.

It's a different story, telling jokes at the expense of others. A lawyer might find lawyer jokes funny, on a personal level... but few lawyers think that the general impression of their profession is either fair, OR funny.

so then...it's the personal motives of others that bothers you?

Kaa
07-31-2009, 10:27 AM
It's the type of joke, Kaa... and I'm sure you know what I mean. Once again, I don't find jokes that denigrate individuals, or entire classes of people to be funny. Surely that isn't the only type of joke in the world, is it? Did you think that joke about Janet Reno and Chelsea Clinton was funny?

In my extensive experience, the great majority of jokes are at someone's expense. They make fun of individuals or entire classes of people. Entirely non-offensive jokes are rare and usually are not that funny.

Yes, I thought that the joke about Janet Reno and Chelsea Clinton was excellent :D

Kaa

Kaa
07-31-2009, 10:44 AM
I wonder what Chelsea Clinton thought of it.

If she were a well-adjusted girl with no self-confidence problems (fat chance), she'd have laughed. Otherwise I suspect she simply shrugged it off. Thick skin is mandatory for someone in her situation.


Maybe she deserved it? I wonder what her sin was.....

You don't make fun of someone because he "deserves" it. That's what punishments are for. You make fun of someone because it's funny :-)

Kaa

Ian McColgin
07-31-2009, 10:47 AM
I get tired of people who believe there's a metaphysical point to lawyer jokes but I like the jokes and like the fact that lawyers can tell the best.

I think part of the consolation of being in one of the more despised and misunderstood of the noble learned professions is the jokes.

Like my brother's PD softball team had tee shirts with the quote from Shakespere, "First we kill all the lawyers." What especially amused them was the overwhelming number of people who really are illiteratly anti-lawyer and who did not get it with the context of that quote.

Like the folk who don't recall that Paladin's starting quote was made by a very high-minded attorney of no discernable sense of humor except about his own profession. It was also used in the musical "1776".

But what do I know. So many of my friends are lawyers and politicians and - shall we use the modern more delicate term? - sex workers.

Kaa
07-31-2009, 10:54 AM
Let's suppose, for a moment, that she was NOT a well adjusted girl with no self confidence problems... let's suppose that she was terribly hurt by the sick joke.

What would be your answer? 'Too frickin' bad'? Would you even care if you had inflicted pain on someone, for the sake of what YOU thought was funny?

My answer would be for her to seek psychological help.

If you're not well-adjusted and have no confidence in yourself, that's a problem regardless of whether anyone tells jokes about you or not.

Inability to deal with people laughing at you is a serious problem, although not rare :-) Practice helps :D

And the Reno joke was funny.

Kaa

stevebaby
07-31-2009, 11:01 AM
I thought it was absolutely hilarious that Dick Cheney shot one of his lawyers. I was all set to take up a collection for more ammo and I almost wrote to the Bar Association for a list of members (targets).
Then a bird flew past my window.

pefjr
07-31-2009, 11:03 AM
Norman, you might need a lawyer if your beloved kindle ate your homework.

http://www.crn.com/retail/218900255;jsessionid=5G2VGRLAVWEKCQSNDLOSKH0CJUNN2 JVN

Ian McColgin
07-31-2009, 11:06 AM
Humor is often cruel and many superb jokes are cruel to someone.

Sometimes even for a good joke one might self-censor out of a sense of good taste and fair play, both charactor traits notably absent in McCain anyway.

But sometimes a joke is not only cruel, it's pretty lame also. McCain's Chelsea/Reno joke is so lame, it should be in the Special Olympics - to make reference to another fameously lame joke.

I happen to like bad jokes and many cruel or politically incorrect jokes. Doesn't mean I tell them all in public.

Kaa
07-31-2009, 11:09 AM
So, if you hurt someone for the sake of a cheap laugh, it's THEIR fault...

I find that attitude positively sickening... and I think it's time we ought to leave it alone.

Think of it as a free HTFU service :D

Of course you'd much prefer that everybody just think of themselves as victims, tiptoe around everything, and apologize for breathing.

Why do you think you have a sense of humor, by the way?

Kaa

Kaa
07-31-2009, 11:13 AM
You don't have to leave it alone, Kaa... but I will.

Oh, you will, will you? :D :D

Kaa

pefjr
07-31-2009, 11:39 AM
"Why do you think you have a sense of humor, by the way?" Kaa


The sixth sense. Takes the edge off life.

Bob Cleek
07-31-2009, 12:42 PM
What a crock of ****... I regularly employ two law firms, one lawyer in particular, bills me about 75 to 100 hours annually since 1992. Most every lawyer I've personally worked with appreciates the self depricating humour of lawyer jokes. I mean come on Norman, you can't be serious!

As a lawyer, I am proud to do my part to provide my fellow citizens with the only opportunity they have left to enjoy telling jokes and sharing a laugh. Now that it isn't politically correct to tell jokes about ANYBODY BUT LAWYERS, if it weren't for us, there'd be no jokes. We certainly wouldn't want to lose all those great punchlines from the days of "Rastus" and "retard" jokes, would we? Try telling one of them these days and you're liable to lose your job like Earl "Loose Shoes" Butz or that cop in Boston!

And, Paul, rest assured, even though we've heard every one of them hundreds of times over, there isn't a lawyer in the world that won't laugh at a client's lawyer joke like it's the first time he's heard it when that client is good for 100 billable hours a year! ROTFLMAO (That's a CLIENT joke.)

Paul Pless
07-31-2009, 12:44 PM
(That's a CLIENT joke.)haha :o:( :D

Andrew Craig-Bennett
07-31-2009, 12:50 PM
As a law student, one starts, rather quickly, to think that the Lord Chancellor's song in "Iolanthe" is perfectly reasonable:

"The Law is the embodiment
Of everything that's excellent
It has no kind of fault or flaw
And I, my Lords, embody the Law!"

John Smith
07-31-2009, 12:53 PM
In my extensive experience, the great majority of jokes are at someone's expense. They make fun of individuals or entire classes of people. Entirely non-offensive jokes are rare and usually are not that funny.

Yes, I thought that the joke about Janet Reno and Chelsea Clinton was excellent :D

Kaa
I agree, up to a point. Jon Stewart makes lots of jokes for whom someone is the butt. All have some truth built in. A few have stereotypes, but he generally makes a joke OF the stereotype, rather than through the stereotype.

One of the funniest scenes I've seen in recent year was Eddie Murphy, as the fat professor, writing on the board while his stomach was erasing it.

Others would laugh at a wheelchair with a flat tire, I would not.

Humor is not only subjective, but also content related.

Remember "Get Smart" and "The Man from Uncle"? This scene was in one of them:

Plan was to be captured, and a miniature transmitter disguised as a pack of gum would be tracked to the "bad guy's" headquarters. All goes well, until upon capture one of the bad guys decides he wants a piece of gum. He takes the pack out of our hero's pocket, takes the last piece, and throw the wrapper, with the transmitter, into the trash.

In one show this is funny. In the other it adds to the suspense.

John Smith
07-31-2009, 12:56 PM
My answer would be for her to seek psychological help.

If you're not well-adjusted and have no confidence in yourself, that's a problem regardless of whether anyone tells jokes about you or not.

Inability to deal with people laughing at you is a serious problem, although not rare :-) Practice helps :D

And the Reno joke was funny.

Kaa
If I may, I believe a joke can be funny, but also be in very bad taste.

Example: I don't know what the people who took the poisoned Tylenol are complaining about. They got rid of their headache, didn't they?

stevebaby
07-31-2009, 12:58 PM
As a lawyer, I am proud to do my part to provide my fellow citizens with the only opportunity they have left to enjoy telling jokes and sharing a laugh. Now that it isn't politically correct to tell jokes about ANYBODY BUT LAWYERS, if it weren't for us, there'd be no jokes. We certainly wouldn't want to lose all those great punchlines from the days of "Rastus" and "retard" jokes, would we? Try telling one of them these days and you're liable to lose your job like Earl "Loose Shoes" Butz or that cop in Boston!

And, Paul, rest assured, even though we've heard every one of them hundreds of times over, there isn't a lawyer in the world that won't laugh at a client's lawyer joke like it's the first time he's heard it when that client is good for 100 billable hours a year! ROTFLMAO (That's a CLIENT joke.)One of my lawyers took 15 minutes to make me a cup of lukewarm instant coffee while he chatted up the secretary and then he billed me for it. $AUD75.00.
Pr*ck.
The last laugh is always with the legal profession.
Are we all to expect a bill in six minute increments for your weak joke?
If so............feel free to sue me for your fee in an Australian Court, keeping in mind that they aren't called "Kangaroo Courts" for nothing.:d:d:d

John Smith
07-31-2009, 12:58 PM
Oh, you will, will you? :D :D

Kaa
I'm not going to argue with you today

Oh yes you are!

Oh No I'm not.


etc.......

JBreeze
07-31-2009, 01:11 PM
Why does the U.S. have or need so many lawyers?

Here are some stats:

Country Lawyers Population People/Lawyer

US: Lawyers: 1,143,358 Pop: 303MM P/L:265
Brazil: Lawyers: 571,360 Pop: 186MM P/L: 326
New Zealand: Lawyers: 10,523 Pop: 4MM P/L 391

Spain Lawyers:114,143 Pop: 45MM P/L:395
Italy Lawyers:121,380 Pop: 59MM P/L:488
UK Lawyers:151,043 Pop: 61MM P/L401
Germany Lawyers:138,679 Pop: 82MM P/L: 593
France Lawyers:45,686 Pop: 64MM P/L: 1,403

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_country_in_the_world_has_most_lawyers_per_cap ita

Japan effectively has about 100 "lawyers" per 100,000 population, or about a 1000:1 people to lawyer ratio.

http://www.nytimes.com/1991/08/23/opinion/l-what-statistics-on-japan-s-lawyers-mean-245091.html

Does the U.S. really require so many, or is it because most of the politicians are lawyers and they take care of themselves first?

Hard to believe the quality of life is so much better in the U.S. than elsewhere:rolleyes:

pefjr
07-31-2009, 01:16 PM
I still don't understand how McCain got away with that joke. He nailed 4 people hard, and walked away from it untouched. He pulled a "Don Rickles"

Bob Cleek
07-31-2009, 01:27 PM
One of my lawyers took 15 minutes to make me a cup of lukewarm instant coffee while he chatted up the secretary and then he billed me for it. $AUD75.00.
Pr*ck.
The last laugh is always with the legal profession.
Are we all to expect a bill in six minute increments for your weak joke?
If so............feel free to sue me for your fee in an Australian Court, keeping in mind that they aren't called "Kangaroo Courts" for nothing.:d:d:d

No, it was provided free of charge. If I didn't charge $450 an hour when I was working, I wouldn't be able to cast these free pearls of wisdom before you swine in the Bilge!

BTW, I consider billing a client for time spent doing anything other than paying direct, immediate and undistracted attention to their case, such as getting a cup a coffee, chatting up a secretary, or taking a crap (unless you are thinking about the client's case at the same time), just plain dishonest. Hiring a lawyer is like hiring any other service provider, "caveat emptor." Sounds like you may want to consider other options. Most American lawyers' offices provide free coffee to clients, but maybe it's different in Australia.

J P
07-31-2009, 01:36 PM
Why does the U.S. have or need so many lawyers?

In small towns, where there can be often be conflict of interest issues, it's good to have lots of lawyers to chose from.




screwed ... screwing around ... screwed twice ... I know there's a joke in there somewhere. ;)

Phillip Allen
07-31-2009, 01:39 PM
In small towns, where there can be often be conflict of interest issues, it's good to have lots of lawyers to chose from.




screwed ... screwing around ... screwed twice ... I know there's a joke in there somewhere. ;)

the built in problem with small town lawyers is they won't get caught working against the city fathers...

J P
07-31-2009, 01:46 PM
the built in problem with small town lawyers is they won't get caught working against the city fathers...

I'd agree with that. Sometimes best to hire one from away.

paladin
07-31-2009, 01:52 PM
I LOVE THIS PLACE. Not only did I just win a lobster dinner at The Chart House in Annapolis but I won TWO......When it hit two pages without slowing down.

Phillip Allen
07-31-2009, 01:53 PM
who lost, Chuck?

Phillip Allen
07-31-2009, 01:55 PM
off topic for a moment...Chuck, I left a quart jar of honey for ya at lefty's...as soon as someone is going the right direction to carry it to ya

pefjr
07-31-2009, 01:59 PM
http://www.ahajokes.com/g/small.gif
Actual stupid questions asked

They were taken from real court records.

Now doctor, isn't it true that when a person dies in his sleep, in most cases he just passes quietly away and doesn't know anything about it until the next morning?

Q: What happened then?
A: He told me, he says, "I have to kill you because you can identify me."
Q: Did he kill you?

Was it you or your brother that was killed in the war?

The youngest son, the 20-year-old, how old is he?

Q: She had three children, right?
A: Yes.
Q: How many were boys?
A: None.
Q: Were there any girls?

Were you alone or by yourself?

Q: I show you Exhibit 3 and ask you if you recognize that picture?
A: That's me.
Q: Were you present when that picture was taken?

Were you present in court this morning when you were sworn in?

Q: You say that the stairs went down to the basement?
A: Yes.
Q: And these stairs, did they go up also?

Q: Now then, Mrs. Johnson, how was your first marriage terminated?
A: By death.
Q: And by whose death was it terminated?

Q: Do you know how far pregnant you are now?
A: I'll be three months on March 12th.
Q: Apparently then, the date of conception was around January 12th?
A: Yes.
Q: What were you doing at that time?

Do you have any children or anything of that kind?

Was that the same nose you broke as a child?

Q: Mrs. Jones, do you believe you are emotionally stable?
A: I used to be.
Q: How many times have you committed suicide?

So, you were gone until you returned?

You don't know what it was, and you didn't know what it looked like, but can you describe it?

Q: Have you lived in this town all your life?
A: Not yet.

A Texas attorney, realizing he was on the verge of unleashing a stupid question, interrupted himself and said, "Your Honor, I'd like to strike the next question."

Q: Do you recall approximately the time that you examined that body of Mr. Huntington at St. Mary's Hospital?
A: It was in the evening. The autopsy started about 5:30 P.M.
Q: And Mr. Huntington was dead at the time, is that correct?
A: No, you idiot, he was sitting on the table wondering why I was performing an autopsy on him!

paladin
07-31-2009, 02:04 PM
Thanks...you have some rocks in the mail...
and I can't tell who lost......but it was a lulu.......:D

Phillip Allen
07-31-2009, 02:07 PM
send pics...

stevebaby
07-31-2009, 06:33 PM
No, it was provided free of charge. If I didn't charge $450 an hour when I was working, I wouldn't be able to cast these free pearls of wisdom before you swine in the Bilge!

BTW, I consider billing a client for time spent doing anything other than paying direct, immediate and undistracted attention to their case, such as getting a cup a coffee, chatting up a secretary, or taking a crap (unless you are thinking about the client's case at the same time), just plain dishonest. Hiring a lawyer is like hiring any other service provider, "caveat emptor." Sounds like you may want to consider other options. Most American lawyers' offices provide free coffee to clients, but maybe it's different in Australia.I gave him the benefit of the doubt...she was a very pretty secretary and I think he just forgot what he was supposed to be attending to. He only billed me for the time, not the coffee,and I never received a final bill from them, so I probably came out ahead anyway.
The irony was that I owned a coffee shop at the time, and if I could have charged that much for a coffee, I certainly would have.

pefjr
07-31-2009, 07:33 PM
Consultation fees
A lawyer's dog, running around town unleashed, heads for a butcher shop and steals a roast. The butcher goes to the lawyer's office and asks, "if a dog running unleashed steals a piece of meat from my store, do I have a right to demand payment for the meat from the dog's owner?" The lawyer answers, "Absolutely."

"Then you owe me $8.50. Your dog was loose and stole a roast from me today."

The lawyer, without a word, writes the butcher a check for $8.50. The butcher, having a feeling of satisfaction, leaves.

Three days later, the butcher finds a bill from the lawyer: $100 due for a consultation

Bob Cleek
07-31-2009, 07:39 PM
I gave him the benefit of the doubt...she was a very pretty secretary and I think he just forgot what he was supposed to be attending to. He only billed me for the time, not the coffee,and I never received a final bill from them, so I probably came out ahead anyway.
The irony was that I owned a coffee shop at the time, and if I could have charged that much for a coffee, I certainly would have.

See, there you go... he never sent you a final bill. Sounds like a decent fellow, and a good businessman!

brad9798
08-01-2009, 06:47 AM
Norman asks:


Have you read any more about the case than what was reported in the tabloids?

Are you aware that McDonalds had a policy of serving coffee at temperatures far in excess of coffee served elsewhere? That the difference in temperature was the difference between moderate pain, and serious burn damage?

Are you aware that McDonalds had knowledge of a number of other people who had serious burns from the excessively hot coffee?

Are you aware that McDonalds settled a number of cases of burn injury out of court?

Yes, yes, yes, and YES!

Are you aware that I typed that I agreed with her sueing them? :confused: Or did you miss that line?

John Smith
08-01-2009, 07:01 AM
See, there you go... he never sent you a final bill. Sounds like a decent fellow, and a good businessman!

I've a different take on some of this. A great deal of a lawyer's work is thinking. How many of us, while typing here, are thinking about how to make a repair on our boat or how to go about some other project we have in mind?

George Jung
08-01-2009, 11:38 AM
I often arrive at conclusions to diagnostic dilemmas in my off hours - I imagine that's a diagnostic epiphany, eh? Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night with an insight - and I write them down, so I recall them in the morning. Given a choice, I'd prefer to sleep - the subconscious thought process tends to interrupt my beauty sleep - but it's not really under conscious control - and it's really a bit of 'the fun' of medicine, when you discover a breakthrough for an individual. And no, I don't 'bill them extra' for the effort. BTW, my accountant tells a similar story - good accountant!

I did enjoy the exchange between Norman and Kaa (among others). I think everyone here knows Norman has a good sense of humor (we've been told, innumerable times!) - but just a thought.

Perhaps it does not mean what you think it means, eh? Most humor has a bit of truth about it, targets someone or some group, and unless that group is an unprotected one (lawyers, Drs. and middle aged bald white guys comes to mind) someone gets a burr under their saddle. Which, come to think of it, is a bit of a joke in itself!:p:D

pcford
08-01-2009, 11:47 AM
I LOVE THIS PLACE. Not only did I just win a lobster dinner at The Chart House in Annapolis but I won TWO......When it hit two pages without slowing down.

Jeebus, chuck, do you ever buy yourself food? You are forever trotting out this one out... Who is the guy who is feeding you? He must be broke by now.

Or are you attempting to prove (yet again) that you are superior to the rest of the bilge inhabitants?

---------------------------------------
The rooster carp...down here with the rest of the bottom feeders

Paul Pless
08-01-2009, 11:50 AM
I think everyone here knows Norman has a good sense of humor (we've been told, innumerable times!) > :eek:

Paul Pless
08-01-2009, 11:51 AM
> :D

pcford
08-01-2009, 11:54 AM
Yep...lawyers are VERY useful. What if you spill a cup of hot coffee in your lap...who will you get to help you get "proper" compensation?



Phillip...try...just try...to think for yourself instead of regurgitating pap from the right wing corporatist apologist wind machine.

The famous McDonalds hot coffee case: 1. McDonalds was warned about their coffee temperature. 2. The woman sustained very dangerous burns (third degree?) 3. The woman asked McDonalds to pay for medical expenses only. They refused.

These facts are easily verifiable via google...I will leave that to you.

One of the amazing things about the current political environment is how corporations can convince people to vote against their own interests.

The current health insurance smoke screen is a perfect case in point. "Granny killers" anyone?

---------------------------------------
The rooster carp...down here with the rest of the bottom feeders

Phillip Allen
08-01-2009, 12:14 PM
Phillip...try...just try...to think for yourself instead of regurgitating pap from the right wing corporatist apologist wind machine.

The famous McDonalds hot coffee case: 1. McDonalds was warned about their coffee temperature. 2. The woman sustained very dangerous burns (third degree?) 3. The woman asked McDonalds to pay for medical expenses only. They refused.

These facts are easily verifiable via google...I will leave that to you.

One of the amazing things about the current political environment is how corporations can convince people to vote against their own interests.

The current health insurance smoke screen is a perfect case in point. "Granny killers" anyone?

---------------------------------------
The rooster carp...down here with the rest of the bottom feeders

I hate being lied to...water at boiling point (212 degrees F) will not cause charing of skin...third degree burns...second degree only...the first lie taints all the rest

it is possible the addition of coffee to the water may raise the boiling point but I suspect it would not be enough to char skin

pcford
08-01-2009, 12:26 PM
I hate being lied to...water at boiling point (212 degrees F) will not cause charing of skin...third degree burns...second degree only...the first lie taints all the rest

it is possible the addition of coffee to the water may raise the boiling point but I suspect it would not be enough to char skin


PHILLIP!!!!

Read the details of the case!!!! Do I have to google it for you!!!!??

Always easier just to go with your prejudices right? Try to think. It won't hurt.

Bob Triggs
08-01-2009, 01:07 PM
I hate lawyers.

George Jung
08-01-2009, 01:16 PM
I received this in my emails today - from a friend who should know better, but.... didn't bother checking it's veracity.


I AM HONORED TO DO THIS















Send it to every person you know. ACLU Can’t do **** about it….

Did you know that the ACLU has filed a suit to have all military cross-shaped headstones removed and another suit to end prayer from the military completely. They're making great progress. The Navy Chaplains can no longer mention Jesus' name in prayer thanks to the retched ACLU and our new administration.


I'm not breaking this one. If I get it a 1000 times, I'll forward it a 1000 times!







Prayer chain for our Military... Don't break it!






Please send this on after a short prayer.. Prayer for our soldiers Don't break it!






Prayer:






'Lord, hold our troops in your loving hands Protect them as they protect us Bless them and their families for the selfless acts they perform for us in our time of need. Amen.'






Prayer Request: When you receive this, please stop for a moment and say a prayer for our troops around the world.






There is nothing attached. Just send this to people in your address book. Do not let it stop with you. Of all the gifts you could give a Marine, Soldier, Sailor, Airman, &others deployed in harm's way, prayer is the very best one.






GOD BLESS YOU FOR PASSING IT ON

!





A quick check with Snopes tells all.... but amazing how few bother, although they've been 'had' numerous times before. Unfortunately, this kind of detritus paints anything that might be 'positive' with that same tainted brush. Gotta separate the garbage from the good.

Phillip Allen
08-01-2009, 03:31 PM
I got the same one...dismissed it out of hand as no one can be THAT stupid

Phillip Allen
08-01-2009, 03:33 PM
PHILLIP!!!!

Read the details of the case!!!! Do I have to google it for you!!!!??

Always easier just to go with your prejudices right? Try to think. It won't hurt.

you're not the only one to try and claim third degree burns can happen from a cup of coffee...why don't YOU try to think a little?!

our court system has become an informal lottery

pcford
08-01-2009, 05:34 PM
you're not the only one to try and claim third degree burns can happen from a cup of coffee...why don't YOU try to think a little?!

our court system has become an informal lottery

So you think the doctors are lying as well as the attorneys then, huh?

Try to be a little more discerning...Rush Limbo is not the fount of all wisdom. It's incredible what the uncritical will believe....Do you believe that Obama is out to kill grannies with his health plan. That's what the health insurance corporations are peddling now.

---------------------------------------
The rooster carp...down here with the rest of the bottom feeders

Phillip Allen
08-01-2009, 05:46 PM
care to define what a third degree burn is?

here, I cherry picked this from the internet:

"Skin with a third-degree burn may appear white or black and leathery on the surface. Because the nerve endings in the skin are destroyed, the burned area may not be painful, but the area around the burn may be extremely painful. Pain causes the breathing rate and pulse to increase. Some areas of the burn may appear bright red, or may blister. Third-degree burns can also damage fat, muscle, and bone."

pcford
08-01-2009, 07:55 PM
care to define what a third degree burn is?

here, I cherry picked this from the internet:

"Skin with a third-degree burn may appear white or black and leathery on the surface. Because the nerve endings in the skin are destroyed, the burned area may not be painful, but the area around the burn may be extremely painful. Pain causes the breathing rate and pulse to increase. Some areas of the burn may appear bright red, or may blister. Third-degree burns can also damage fat, muscle, and bone."

Phillip, you certainly seem to have a lackadaisical attitude toward investigating the facts. Since you won't look yourself I have c&p a page about the McDonald's hot coffee legal proceeding. Pay particular attention to the part where they discuss the THIRD DEGREE BURNS which occurred.

I can understand totally why people directly invested in immoral Wall Street corporations would act to protect their interests. Totally rational. The mystery is how those corporations can convince people of modest means to act in the interest of immoral corporate interests and against their own.

Easy to let other people do your thinking I guess.



The Actual Facts About
The Mcdonalds' Coffee Case

There is a lot of hype about the McDonalds' scalding coffee case. No
one is in favor of frivolous cases of outlandish results; however, it is
important to understand some points that were not reported in most of
the stories about the case. McDonalds coffee was not only hot, it was
scalding -- capable of almost instantaneous destruction of skin, flesh
and muscle. Here's the whole story.

Stella Liebeck of Albuquerque, New Mexico, was in the passenger seat of
her grandson's car when she was severely burned by McDonalds' coffee in
February 1992. Liebeck, 79 at the time, ordered coffee that was served
in a styrofoam cup at the drivethrough window of a local McDonalds.

After receiving the order, the grandson pulled his car forward and
stopped momentarily so that Liebeck could add cream and sugar to her
coffee. (Critics of civil justice, who have pounced on this case, often
charge that Liebeck was driving the car or that the vehicle was in
motion when she spilled the coffee; neither is true.) Liebeck placed
the cup between her knees and attempted to remove the plastic lid from
the cup. As she removed the lid, the entire contents of the cup spilled
into her lap.

The sweatpants Liebeck was wearing absorbed the coffee and held it next
to her skin. A vascular
(http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm#) determined that Liebeck suffered full
thickness burns (or third-degree burns) over 6 percent of her body,
including her inner thighs, perineum, buttocks, and genital and groin
areas. She was hospitalized for eight days, during which time she
underwent skin grafting. Liebeck, who also underwent debridement
treatments, sought to settle her claim for $20,000, but McDonalds
refused.

During discovery, McDonalds produced (http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm#)
(http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm#) showing more than 700
claims by people burned by its coffee between 1982 and 1992. Some claims
involved third-degree burns substantially similar to Liebecks. This
history documented McDonalds' knowledge about the extent and nature of
this hazard.

McDonalds also said during discovery that, based on a consultants
advice, it held its coffee at between 180 and 190 degrees (http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm#)to
maintain optimum taste. He admitted that he had not evaluated the
safety ramifications at this temperature. Other establishments sell
coffee at substantially lower temperatures, and coffee served at (http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm#)is
generally 135 to 140 degrees.

Further, McDonalds' (http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm#) manager testified that the company
actively enforces a requirement that coffee be held in the pot at 185
degrees, plus or minus five degrees. He also testified that a burn
hazard exists with any food substance served at 140 degrees or above,
and that McDonalds coffee, at the temperature at which it was poured
into styrofoam cups, was not fit for consumption because it would burn
the mouth and throat. The quality assurance manager admitted that burns
would occur, but testified that McDonalds had no intention of reducing
the "holding temperature" of its coffee.

Plaintiffs' expert, a scholar in thermodynamics applied to human skin
burns, testified that liquids, at 180 degrees, will cause a full
thickness burn to human skin in two to seven seconds. Other testimony
showed that as the temperature decreases toward 155 degrees, the extent
of the burn relative to that temperature decreases exponentially. Thus,
if Liebeck's spill had involved coffee at 155 degrees, the liquid would
have cooled and given her time to avoid a serious burn.

McDonalds asserted that customers buy coffee on their way to work or
home, intending to consume it there. However, the companys own research
showed that customers intend to consume the coffee immediately while
driving.

McDonalds also argued that consumers know coffee is hot and that its
customers want it that way. The company admitted its customers were
unaware that they could suffer thirddegree burns from the coffee and
that a statement on the side of the cup was not a "warning" but a
"reminder" since the location of the writing would not warn customers of
the hazard.

The jury awarded Liebeck $200,000 in compensatory damages. This amount
was reduced to $160,000 because the jury found Liebeck 20 percent at
fault in the spill. The jury also awarded Liebeck $2.7 million in
punitive damages, which equals about two days of McDonalds' coffee
sales.

Post-verdict investigation found that the temperature of coffee at the
local Albuquerque McDonalds had dropped to 158 degrees fahrenheit.

The trial court subsequently reduced the punitive award to $480,000 --
or three times compensatory damages -- even though the judge called
McDonalds' conduct reckless, callous and willful.

No one will ever know the final ending to this case.

The parties eventually entered into a secret (http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm#)
(http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm#) which has never
been revealed to the public, despite the fact that this was a public
case, litigated in public and subjected to extensive media reporting.
Such secret settlements, after public trials, should not be condoned.
-----



http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm

Pugwash
08-01-2009, 09:03 PM
In the United States (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States), Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Rules_of_Civil_Procedure) and similar state rules require that an attorney (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attorney_at_law_(United_States)) perform a due diligence (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Due_diligence) investigation concerning the factual basis for any claim or defense. Jurisdictions differ on whether a claim or defense can be frivolous if the attorney acted in good faith (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_faith). Because such a defense or claim wastes the court's and the other parties' time, resources and legal fees, sanctions (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanctions_(law)) may be imposed by a court upon the party or the lawyer who presents the frivolous defense or claim. The law firm may also be sanctioned, or even held in contempt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contempt_of_court).


The McCoffee case has been absorbed into our collective idea of frivolous lawsuits, because so many untruths surround it.

Wanna Google " Chung, pant suit".

But that doesn't count, because it was one of your own that brought it. And once again the lies and deception takes presidence.

pcford
08-01-2009, 09:09 PM
But that doesn't count, because it was one of your own that brought it.

What was the point here?

....anybody?
---------------------------------------
The rooster carp...down here with the rest of the bottom feeders

Pugwash
08-01-2009, 09:18 PM
What was the point here?

....anybody?
---------------------------------------
The rooster carp...down here with the rest of the bottom feeders


The point was that when asked about frivolous lawsuits everyone cites the "McCoffee" case. Which was a legitimate claim, in fact the jury found the plaintife 20% responsible for her own injury.

Nobody ever quotes the "Pant suit" case as an example of dumb claims. Why?

Generally, "they" want you to believe that the stupid lawsuits come from "us". But in fact the really retarded stuff comes from lawyers.

To get to the threads point, I have no problem with lawyer jokes, I have a problem with Bull**** claims about frivolous lawsuits.

:)

falco de fiume
08-01-2009, 09:32 PM
American generally do not know how to curse. In southern Italy (Regio de Calabria) we have this curse: May your life be filled with lawyers.
Richard

John Smith
08-02-2009, 07:10 AM
Phillip, you certainly seem to have a lackadaisical attitude toward investigating the facts. Since you won't look yourself I have c&p a page about the McDonald's hot coffee legal proceeding. Pay particular attention to the part where they discuss the THIRD DEGREE BURNS which occurred.

I can understand totally why people directly invested in immoral Wall Street corporations would act to protect their interests. Totally rational. The mystery is how those corporations can convince people of modest means to act in the interest of immoral corporate interests and against their own.

Easy to let other people do your thinking I guess.


http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm


Thanks for posting this. This is a bunch of facts I don't think any of the media ever presented.

John Smith
08-02-2009, 07:22 AM
The point was that when asked about frivolous lawsuits everyone cites the "McCoffee" case. Which was a legitimate claim, in fact the jury found the plaintife 20% responsible for her own injury.

Nobody ever quotes the "Pant suit" case as an example of dumb claims. Why?

Generally, "they" want you to believe that the stupid lawsuits come from "us". But in fact the really retarded stuff comes from lawyers.

To get to the threads point, I have no problem with lawyer jokes, I have a problem with Bull**** claims about frivolous lawsuits.

:)
I imagine it would be pretty difficult to find an attorney to take a frivilous lawsuit on consignment.

This is another widely accepted myth.

I remember a case of BMW selling cars that had been damaged and repaired without informing the customer. Jury awarded a nice settlement for damages, but gave a major figure of millions for punitive damages, which the judge cut.

Jury members, interviewed later were upset with the judge, cause their number was based on how much you'd have to fine BMW in order to punish them.

That's when I realized the compensation for damages was just that, and the victim deserved it. Punitive damages were deserved by the defendent, but not necessarily by the plaintiff.

My thought then was that the punitive damages go into a fund for when convicted felons are proven innocent.

Phillip Allen
08-02-2009, 07:23 AM
I agree with this paragraph...I began thinking in this way while I was still in my late teens...it seems very few agree with me though:

The parties eventually entered into a secret
which has never
been revealed to the public, despite the fact that this was a public
case, litigated in public and subjected to extensive media reporting.
Such secret settlements, after public trials, should not be condoned.


compensatory damages should be based on actual cost of the plantif...lawyers, time and cost of travel, lost time at work (a house wife is at work too) and the work loss should be figured at the same rate as the lawyer)

the lottery thing comes in when such astronomical "rewards" are awarded as punitive damages...if we must punish the defendant then it should be jail time or the money should go to a third party with no interest in the suit

Phillip Allen
08-02-2009, 07:27 AM
Wow John...we posted the same thought....I'm anti lottery

John Smith
08-02-2009, 07:35 AM
Wow John...we posted the same thought....I'm anti lottery
Does one of us have to change his mind now?:D

Maybe punitive damages can be used to fund health care reform.

One of the problems with this is I'm not sure it's possible to sue a corporation, as they pass the cost onto the consumer.

McDonald's would only have to add a penny or two to the price of their products to make up the cost of the suit.

I really wish we had a system where individual people couldn't hide behind the corporation. The corporation doesn't make decisions, people in it do.

Someone in McDonald's decided to keep serving coffee that hot for reasons related to making more money. In other areas, someone in the car making corporation decided some known defect isn't cost affective to fix.

Our current system doesn't touch those people who may actually be getting bonuses.

YOu can't put a corporation in jail.

Phillip Allen
08-02-2009, 07:51 AM
actually, I suspect the reasons for continuing the over hot coffee were worse...a bunch of very young voters and high school kids not taking initiative...that's why we lowered the voting age

John Smith
08-02-2009, 07:59 AM
actually, I suspect the reasons for continuing the over hot coffee were worse...a bunch of very young voters and high school kids not taking initiative...that's why we lowered the voting age

Having been to McDonald's and had their coffee, the food was all gone and the coffee still hot. This led to taking coffee with you, throwing it out, or buying more food while you sit and finish the coffee.

This is America: bottom line is almost always money.

Pugwash
08-02-2009, 08:22 AM
When I was teaching I had an insurance actuary in the shop. He told me that it costs a minimum of $5000 (and this was 10 years ago) for a company to even think about going to court and dispute a case.

So what happens is that there is a flood of $4999 claims, for whatever (usually "whiplash" injuries).

Caching!! 30% + expenses a couple of hundred times, for just filling out paperwork, a year can be a lucrative enterprise for a lazy lawyer.


The BMW case is a whole different beast. Again, a myth monster.

The paintwork on a car looked "splotchy" so the company had it re-sprayed at a cost of @ $600. And then tried to pass it off to the customer as a new, factory produced, car.

Which it patently was not, the damages awarded were about corporate dishonesty and deception. Not about a $600 re-spray.


Be careful about disparaging "frivolous" lawsuits, because what you are really complaining about is the damages awarded by juries, which is a whole 'nother beast. The lawsuits themselves have merit, otherwise they would not be presented.